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  1. #31
    wclavey's Avatar
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    I purchased this bulb from superbright LEDs:

    http://www.superbrightleds.com/specs/e27-w8.htm

    I use it in a small aluminum utility housing pointed at the ceiling in a small bathroom I use as a darkroom. I have tested it with VC papers and with xray film and found that it does not fog either in 5 minutes.

  2. #32

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    I used a red LED from Radio Shack to make a darkroom flashlight

    the LED's emission was right in the middle of the part of the spectrum you'd want for a safelight...I forget the wavelength...but it was printed on the package & I called Kodak's 1-800-242-2424 tech support to check

    ANYWAY...I wanted to pass on how I made the flashlight since it was so simple:

    get a red "jumbo" LED from Radio Shack ( the BIG one ), a plastic film container, some aluminum foil, and 2 AA batteries

    fold over a couple layers of the foil and put that in the bottom of the plastic film container

    poke 2 holes in the top of the film container & slip the leads for the LED through the holes and bend them over so the LED won't fall out

    put 2 AA batteries in the film container...one + side up, the other + side down

    when you put the top back onto the film container ( if you line everything up carefully ) VOILA the LED is on and works great as a red darkroom flashlight....to turn it off you only need to pull one side of the top up -- you don't need to completely remove it.

    I made one out of desperation when I was temporarily without a normal safelight....I never need to use it anymore, but I always loved it since it was so simple and worked pretty well

  3. #33
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    I just got my order of these from Superbright...

    PRODUCT INFORMATION--

    Quantity: 5
    Product: E27-x8-G LED bulb $ 3.95 (each)
    Options: Red

    They work great. No fogging from 3 feet (1 meter) during paper processing. Nice and bright. about twice as bright as the christmas tree red lights I was using.
    Dennis

  4. #34
    wilsonneal's Avatar
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    I am using two of the Optiled Red lamps in my darkroom with VC papers and have had no problem.
    Neal

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by DarkroomExperimente View Post
    I used a red LED from Radio Shack to make a darkroom flashlight
    FWIW, SuperBrightLEDs sells LED flashlights of various descriptions, as well as LED flashlight bulbs for use in "generic" flashlights. I've got a little red LED keychain flashlight. It's handy for shining light on the enlarger lens's f-stop scale or finding bits of dropped paper. I also take it out with me when I take photos at night, since it's so small.

  6. #36
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    It's easy, the cheapest red LED deco light f.e. for clamp lamps will do the job with every kind of bw paper. Anything else than red must be tested seperately with every kind of paper you use, no matter how cheap or expensive you lamp was. Red is always safe, but orange that I mostly use is more conveniant. Yellow is mostly unsafe. There is absolutely no need to buy expensive safe lights for bw nowadays. The old safe lights with light bulbs and filters are a deal worse.

    Best - Reinhold

  7. #37
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grommi View Post
    Red is always safe...
    Not always.

    Most, if not all, red LEDs also emit small slivers of blue and/or green light. You can't see them with the naked eye as they are overwhelmed by the safe red light. But if you go into a completely dark room and carefully observe the red light as reflected from the business side of a common CD, you might be surprised. The CD acts as an inexpensive prism, breaking the light up into its separate wavelengths.

    Because the slivers are small, if your normal working procedures only expose the paper to the safe light for a short period of time, you might be all right. But if, like me, you often find yourself in a complex and lengthy dodging and burning session, you might begin to experience subtle fogging. I did using 635nm red LEDs.

    The solution is to filter the red LEDs with a single layer of Rubylith.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  8. #38
    grommi's Avatar
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    I made fogging tests with several common red LED sources and up to 10 minutes I got absolutely no fogging at all, I made it properly with pre-exposed paper. Even a cheap bicycle tail light was perfect, assuming you don't aim with the light directly on the paper from a few centimeters distance. Besides that the corner with the enlarger should always be blocked from direct light beams, no matter which source you use.

  9. #39
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    Jobo used to make an LED safelight that looked Amber and they claimed itwould even be safe with Colour Ppaer, (but that was in the days of EP-2 Colour Ppaer) they called it JOBO Minilux if anyone whats to go searching.
    Charles MacDonald
    aa508@ncf.ca
    I still live just beyond the fringe in Stittsville

  10. #40
    Mike-D's Avatar
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    I used red LED brake lights driven by a 12V supply, and red LED Christmas lights with no ill effects. These were great for lighting areas of the darkroom where the main safelight didn't quite reach. The standard test is to put out a piece of enlarging paper with something on it for five minutes. If there is no shadow then the light is safe.

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