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  1. #11
    georgegrosu's Avatar
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    http://www.inorganics.basf.com/p02/C...it-Loesung_45P
    http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/ipcsnfrn/nfrn1200.html

    Molar mass of Potassium Sulfite (K2SO3) = 158.26 g/mol.
    Molar mass of Sodium Sulfite (Na2SO3) = 126.06 g/mol.
    I thing you can substitute Potassium Sulfite with Sodium Sulfite on the rapport of molar mass.

    156.26 g Potassium Sulfite ……………….126.06 g Sodium Sulfite
    your quantity (grams) of Potassium Sulfite ………. X quantity (grams) of Sodium Sulfite

    I use this with sodium Sodium Hydroxide and Potassium Hydroxide,
    Potassium Carbonate, Anhydrous and Sodium Carbonate.
    George

  2. #12
    Ole
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    That substitution works in most cases, but sometimes the one has been chosen over the other due to differences in solubility. So you may find that you can substitute when mixing working solutions, but not stock solutions...
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  3. #13
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mateo View Post
    I think Johnny was refering to something like the following sentence where you just don't know where things are going until the end.

    Wie wilst Du deine Eier am morgen haben?

    Yes, Mateo,

    I didn’t think of that.

    We place the verbum at the end of the sentence in some time forms. However, not commonly in the present tense. Which is done in Dutch however…

    This all is quite complicated; and I’m mumbling anyway.

  4. #14
    Struan Gray's Avatar
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    Useless tidbit: the Swedish word for the element "tungsten" is "wolfram", despite the fact that "tungsten" is in fact a Swedish word.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnywalker View Post
    One exception is that in German you never know who did what to whom until you reach the end of the sentence, where all the verbs reside! At least it seemed that way to me when I took it 45 years ago.
    Yes, the other joke is that volume 2 of the German edition includes the verbs

  6. #16
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Struan Gray View Post
    Useless tidbit: the Swedish word for the element "tungsten" is "wolfram", despite the fact that "tungsten" is in fact a Swedish word.
    Yes ... and the chemical symbol is "W".

    Tungsten: "heavy stone" - which it certainly IS.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  7. #17
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Well, for a good laugh, read Mark Twain's "That Awful German Language" in which he writes some of it in English with German sentence structure, and so in the essay his heroine leaves home and de from the station parted. (separation of prefix and verb), and his stork on the chimney is fun too in the same article.

    For my German class, two of us translated Le Chanson de Roland directly from French to German. That was a real hoot. And, for graduate school I had to translate 25 pages of the Fischer Lexicon into English from German.

    Back to sodium and potassium salts now.......

    Potassium sulfite is very very soluable compared to sodium sulfite. In fact, you cannot make a 45% sodium sulfite solution! In addition, the ionic strength is different between potassium and sodium salts, diffusion is different and effects on silver halide solubility are very different.

    In fact, potassium salts render silver halides so insoluable (in a simple sense) that they can stop the action of hypo in a fix so never use potassium or calcium thiosulfate in a fix.

    In any event, a developer with all potassium salts behaves differently than one with sodium salts as to development rate and curve shape. I have done the experiment quantitatively.

    Also, generally, potassium salts are more expensive in the US than Europe and Sodium salts are more expensive in Europe than the US. That is a generalization but is related to the huge soda ash deposits in the southwest of the US.

    PE
    Last edited by Photo Engineer; 11-08-2007 at 10:30 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #18
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    PE, I think you meant "heroine", not "heroin".

    If all you are concerned about is ionic concentration, a 36% solution of sodium sulfite has as many ions as a 45% solution of potassium sulfite. I haven't looked to see if 36% is possible.

    A German wind tunnel is a luftfahrtbildnung IIRC from my NASA days.
    Gadget Gainer

  9. #19
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    Thanks Patrick, I've fixed my drug indued error. I'm still not awake today, but I'm not sure, as I'm not awake.

    And, a translation program converted the Russian for "hydraulic ram" to "wet male sheep" in English, much to our delight.

    PE

  10. #20

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    Just for the record: "Pottasche" is also used in German and means potassium carbonate, which was produced in a "Pott" (pot) from "Asche" (ash); you can see, almost the same as in English. BTW, only in the north they use the word "Pott", while here in the south we say "Topf".

    "Wolfram" (the same both in German and Swedish) was named by an alchemist in the 16th century, who found a mineral which forcefully turned melted tin into slag ("eats it like a wolf") and called this mineral "lupus sumi" (latin), which means "Wolf-Rahm" in German or "wolf-cream" in English.

    I really like this old-fashioned way to name things both in chemistry and biology so much more than the modern, quite unimaginative names.

    Georg

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