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  1. #1
    Trask's Avatar
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    "Kaliumsulfit - Lsg. 45%" in German - what's that in English?

    I have a formula for Rodinal Special SB in German that I found on the web some time ago, during the time that RS was no longer being produced (it's now back in production, I read). The formula calls for Kaliumsulfit -- Lsg.45%, which I read as Potassium Sulfite. Unfortunately, I cannot find anyone who sells it or even any reference to it existing -- Potassium Metabisulfite, yes, but Potassium Sulfite, no.

    Anyone who has photochemical experience in German out there who can tell me what is needed?

    FYI, the other components are Potassium Bromide, Triethanolamin, Hydroquinone, Phenidone and EDTA -- plus some water, of course.

  2. #2
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Potassium Sulfite at 45% in water.

    It is available at that concentration from many chemical companies. I believe that you can get it from the Photographers Formulary for one.

    PE

  3. #3
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    Interesting that the German and Latin names for potassium are identical. I never studied German, though I had my fill and beyond of Latin.

    Does the German language borrow heavily from Latin? Makes sense if so, given the mingling of Roman and German in the late Republic and Empire.

    Completely off topic, sorry...
    Michael Sebastian
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    The names of the early known elements in most languages are taken from Latin Mike. The exception is English, and so Kalium is used in German and Japanese. Natrium is used everywhere for Sodium.

    AAMOF, the chemcial symbols are taken from the original Latin names, so Na for Sodium and K for Potassium. Our names come from "Soda Ash" and "Potash" in English.

    BTW, one person once argued that Agfa did not use Potassium Iodide in a specific emulsion formula, but there it was, KJ, the German symbols for KI in English.

    PE

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeSeb View Post

    Does the German language borrow heavily from Latin? Makes sense if so, given the mingling of Roman and German in the late Republic and Empire.
    My wife says the grammar is remarkably close (she was talking about this the other night as she's learning German right now). I don't know either myself.
    The universe is a haunted house. -Coil
    .

  6. #6
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    As I understand it, Italic spawned Latin, which then gave us:-
    Italian, French, Provencal, Spanish, Catalan, Portuguese and Romanian.

    Germanic spawned north Germanic and west Germanic. Nth Germanic has most, if not all Scandinavian languages under the sub headings, East Norse and West Norse.

    West Germanic gave us High German, which morphed into Yiddish and German. Low German was another branch which gave us old and modern Frisian, Middle Dutch, Dutch and Flemish. Old Saxon is another branch which gives us middle, low German and Platt Deutsch. The Anglo Saxon arm gives us middle and modern English.

    Source:- Webster's unabridged dictionary, second edition. As this source is close to 30 years old (at least my dictionary) things could have changed somewhat, though I doubt it.

    Mick.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by walter23 View Post
    My wife says the grammar is remarkably close (she was talking about this the other night as she's learning German right now). I don't know either myself.
    One exception is that in German you never know who did what to whom until you reach the end of the sentence, where all the verbs reside! At least it seemed that way to me when I took it 45 years ago.
    If I had been present at the creation, I would have given some useful hints for the better arrangement of the Universe.
    Alfonso the Wise, 1221-1284

  8. #8
    AgX
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    I'm living on Roman soil.

    (Referring to their military-industrial complex; though archeologists don't like that sort of reference...)

  9. #9
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnywalker View Post
    One exception is that in German you never know who did what to whom until you reach the end of the sentence, where all the verbs reside!

    Well, it depends on the chosen structure:

    Der Hund beißt den Mann. (The dog bites the dog.)
    Der Mann beißt den Hund. (the opposite meaning)

    However,

    Der Hund beißt den Mann.
    Den Mann beißt der Hund. (both have the same meaning)

    You can change positions with the articles still hinting at the subject/object relation.
    You wouldn't be able to do that in Dutch/Flemish.

  10. #10
    Mateo's Avatar
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    I think Johnny was refering to something like the following sentence where you just don't know where things are going until the end.

    Wie wilst Du deine Eier am morgen haben?
    "If I only had a brain"-Some badly dressed guy made of straw in some movie I think I saw

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