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  1. #21
    alexmacphee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dynachrome View Post
    the bottles should be clearly labeled so no one mistakes D-76 for Grolsch.
    More seriously, you could mistake the Grolsch for D76.

    I seem to remember from my lab days (not photo lab) that some chemical solutions were kept in dark bottles because they were photo-sensitive and could change composition when subjected to too much light. Nothing, as far as I'm aware, to do with any risk of alkali leeching out of clear bottles.
    Alex

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Jones View Post
    A clear bottle stored in the dark is as good as a dark bottle. My diluted T-Max developer lasts up to a year in soft drink bottles stored in black plastic photo paper envelopes.
    Agreed, My chemistry is stored in the darkroom which is dark 95% of the time..EC

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by modafoto View Post
    Alive and well...
    I am glad!

    Matt

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    Why do people think the bottles need to be dark? Is this based on any fact at all, or just FUD?
    I think it may have been the case at one time, that some chemicals may have needed dark bottles. It then became tradition that certain chemistries were stored in dark bottles. I don't know if it's the case anymore, as you get companies like Ilford that put all their chemical concentrates in white plastic bottles that are certainly not dark storage.

    What may be a more practical reason for different colour bottles is so you don't mix them up. For example if your film developer is in a dark green bottle and your print developer is a brown bottle, and your stop is in an amber bottle and your fixer in a clear bottle, it's a lot harder to mix them up. Although you could accomplish the same thing with some colour electrical tape, picking a different colour for each solution.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

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