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Thread: AZO?

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    AZO?

    Okay, so I know that Azo is a silver chloride paper. Everyone is always talking about the joys and capabilities of silver chloride papers. But what's the significance of the name? Surely there's some azo compound in the paper? What is it? Is it in any way chemically similar to the azo dyes I read about in other photographic papers like ciba/ilfochrome? In general, are Azo papers (Kodak and non-Kodak) unique because of some combination of silver chloride and azo compounds, that might separate them from non azo containing silver chloride papers? Sorry, lots of technical questions I know.

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    Curt's Avatar
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    No, I just won't do it, I'm tempted but I just can't.
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

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    Am I that stupid?

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    Let me guess. They call it Azo because of Amidol?

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    There are no Azo chemicals in Azo paper. Azo is a trade name for a particular Silver Chloride contact paper which used to be made by Kodak. At one time, most paper manufacturers had a similar paper. Velox is another paper that was made by Kodak that was similar. Many paper names are just trade names.
    Azo has developed a legendary following since its demise. This is partially due to the quality of the images, and partially due to the fact that no one is making a similar paper.

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    Right, but you didn't answer my question. Why would they call the paper Azo if there are no azo compounds in the paper? Is it because it used to only be developed in amidol or something?

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    Like any other silver paper, you can develop Azo in just about anything you want to. There are just a few highly visible practitioners of the Azo/Amidol pairing, and so people think the two are a requirement.

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    I understand that, but it still doesn't answer my question...

  9. #9
    ann
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    Perhaps PE will chime in here with some back story about this name; however, how does anything acquire a name.

    Sometimes it may have something to do with it's make up or just a marketing whim.

    Years ago my favorite paper was Brovia, heaven only knows why it was called that and frankly it never crossed my mind to wonder about it's name, altho i still miss it's wonderful blacks.
    http://www.aclancyphotography.com

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    FYI It was called brovira because it was a bromide paper. I'm hoping that PE will, indeed, chime in at some point.

    This is along the same lines of why I'm wondering about the name Azo for a paper that apparently doesn't have any azo in it!

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