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  1. #21
    tim_walls's Avatar
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    I can definitely agree with everyone else that a stronger dilution of LD20 than recommended helps; I can't remember what I settled on for the lith print exchange, but it was around 1:20. At the lower dilutions the highlights and midtones were a beautiful pink colour (on Fotospeed lith paper) but actually getting any infectious development going to bring out the shadow tones was an exercise in frustration.

    At the around 1:20 dilution, the blacks did start to rapidly develop, although they never fully blocked up, leaving a nice speckly appearance in the shadows. (Speckled Jim keeps popping into my head now...)


    I put my troubles at the recommended dilution down to my own incompetence, so actually quite pleased I don't seem to be alone ;-).
    Another day goes under; a little bourbon will take the strain...

  2. #22

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    Resourse with out going into storage

    Tim has a website and is very gracious in responding to questions sent via the website. google the world of lith printing and you will find it. I use Fotospeed starting at 1:1:12 and have been getting some nice results with the Forte papers - (although I have not contined as Forte is no longer manufactured) Tim's website is also a great resourse on materials new and old. I can tell you from experience that every time you change a variable in lith it will change the look - many times drastically. My standard used to be Nacco lith developer 1:1:12 with Forte Polywarmtone Art. The combination gave nice texture and a color that really fit my work. As far as the Fotospeed developer they have a paper as well that, as would be expected, works nicely with the developer (again I used 1:1:12)The combinations are endless but again - Tim is the Master and a great resourse for troubleshooting

    Good Luck

    Gina

    Quote Originally Posted by unhinged View Post
    Hello there. I'm asking this here as the two Tim Rudman books on the subject I recently purchased are in storage somewhere. I've developed 6 prints now, all in Fotospeed LD20 and on Kentmere Kentona and Forte Polywarmtone and the prints have all come out lovely but they're just normal. There's a small sign of the heavier concentration of dark tones coming through but not a lot. Apart from the colour change there's not a lot to tell them apart from an ordinairy developed print. The scanner's in storage too so I can't really show an example. I'm using the instructions that came with the developer which said 15ml of each with water to make up a litre of solution. I'm getting 3 prints at a time though I did end up spending 25 minutes on the last print last night so do I need a bit more developer to get this "explosive" development. I think the papers I'm using are all said to be suitable for the job. The development seems to be pretty flat at the moment and I certainly don't need to "snatch" it. I've tried long and short exposures with the prints coming out pretty much the same each time. What have I done wrong?

  3. #23

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    Only just came across this very timely thread - I've been playing around with Lith printing for the first time last week using LD20 and Fotospeed Lith paper. What an elusive process!! Now you see it, now you don't. By the third session I felt as though I was finally learning something - even though I've got both Tim's books on Lith printing nothing really made sense until I'd thrown a lot of expensive paper away. Finally came up with the combination of 50ml PartA, 50 ml Part B, 100 ml Old Brown to two litres of water at 30deg.C. Sounds hot but cools fairly quickly to about 22-25deg.C and achieved my best results this way. Went though 15 sheets of 10 x 8 at $4 a pop to get two decent prints - I think I'll save my 50 sheets of 12 x 16 for some very special occasions but fear I'm addicted already.
    Conclusion:- Lith Printing is the Photographic Equivalent of Playing Golf.
    Patricia in Tassie

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