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  1. #21

    Join Date
    Jun 2006
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    Ottawa, Canada
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    I don't use hardener with paper. I will always use it with film. I also use a hypo clearing agent and wash film a long time. But for me, it is just too risky without hardener for film.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    New Jersey
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    Well, first the items mentioned in prior posts that are different from what I do: since I use PMK, I use non-hardening fixer. I change the orientation of the negatives in the tray by rotating 90 degrees each "quarter of total time" (i.e. if my time is 12 minutes, I rotate the stack one-quarter turn each 3 minutes). I also develop emulsion side down, but this is personal preference, I think you will find roughly 50% of people who tray develop do emulsion up, the others emulsion down. Lastly, I think the biggest item impacting scratching is the amount of liquid in the trays. The more liquid (i.e. the "deeper" the liquid) the less likely you are to scratch. I think it is those who are trying to economize on chemicals who have the most problems.
    Regards, Pete Lewin

  3. #23

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    Dec 2005
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    Hollis, NH
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    i guess i am lucky
    i have been processing film in open trays for about 10 ( or 13?) years
    never had problems. maybe 1 with scratches in all that time.
    i process 4x5 in 5x7 trays, once in a blue moon in 8x10 ...
    i never process less than 8 sheets, and have shuffled upto 28 sheets at once.
    i guess it takes practice and luck ...

    john
    Hi John,
    just curious what developer you use? I use PMK pyro and I think that with pyro and pyrocat developers, using the 8x10 trays with 4x5 film becomes much more important. I think that pyro developers have more problems with uneven development due to turbulence in the tray than conventional developers do.

    Dan

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by dslater View Post
    Hi John,
    just curious what developer you use? I use PMK pyro and I think that with pyro and pyrocat developers, using the 8x10 trays with 4x5 film becomes much more important. I think that pyro developers have more problems with uneven development due to turbulence in the tray than conventional developers do.

    Dan
    hi dan

    i use a few different developers for sheets
    mostly i use ansco 130 (shhh, i know it is for paper! )
    within the last year i started use sprint film developer ( sort of like d76 )
    again. used it for a long time, and strayed. its kind of nice

    never used pryo developers ... always wanted to though ...

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    New Jersey
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    62
    Quote Originally Posted by dslater View Post
    Hi John,
    just curious what developer you use? I use PMK pyro and I think that with pyro and pyrocat developers, using the 8x10 trays with 4x5 film becomes much more important. I think that pyro developers have more problems with uneven development due to turbulence in the tray than conventional developers do.

    Dan
    Dan, just to provide a slightly different approach: I use PMK in the food storage containers you can buy in a super market, I think something like 6x8". I got the idea from Ken Lee's website, the section on processing. The containers are deeper than 8x10 trays (at least for me, more depth = less chance for scratches) and the reduced surface area (48 sq in vs. 80 sq in) means less PMK oxidation during processing. Rotating the negatives periodically, as I mentioned in my earlier post, seems to eliminate uneven development, since any turbulence is evenly distributed.
    Regards, Pete Lewin

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    Hollis, NH
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    Quote Originally Posted by palewin View Post
    Dan, just to provide a slightly different approach: I use PMK in the food storage containers you can buy in a super market, I think something like 6x8". I got the idea from Ken Lee's website, the section on processing. The containers are deeper than 8x10 trays (at least for me, more depth = less chance for scratches) and the reduced surface area (48 sq in vs. 80 sq in) means less PMK oxidation during processing. Rotating the negatives periodically, as I mentioned in my earlier post, seems to eliminate uneven development, since any turbulence is evenly distributed.
    Hi Pete,
    sounds interesting - to be honest, I develop most of my film in a Jobo. I have only used tray development a few times when I wanted to experiment with minimal agitation to see if I got more edge effects. In that case I processed 1 sheet at a time.

    Dan

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