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  1. #1

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    OK to freeze exposed, undeveloped film?

    It looks like I'm going to have little time and financial resources to develop about 30 rolls of film (35mm & 120 format Tri-X) that I will shoot between now and Christmas, but will likely have to wait until next spring to develop.

    Is it generally okay to freeze exposed but undeveloped film? It would seem logical that what's good for undeveloped film should be so for developed film.

    Your advice is greatly appreciated, as always!

  2. #2

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    There is no reason to freeze exposed black-and-white film if you are going to develop it within a few months of exposing. I've left exposed roll film at room temperature for nearly a year with no problems. No fog, no noticeable loss of film speed, zilch, nada, zero. Many different brands and speeds of film.

    In fact, you might experience more problems moving film that's been removed from its moisture-proof container in and out of the freezer than new, factory-wrapped film. If you decide to freeze it, put it in foil in a ziplock baggie so that when you bring it out, moisture won't condense on it. Leave it in the bag until it's warmed to room temp.

    Peter Gomena

  3. #3
    Curt's Avatar
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    I just developed negatives that I exposed while in Houston and Galveston the day after Katrina and before Rita. They developed perfectly with no bad effects. They were 5x7, for some reason I just didn't get around to developing them, the longer time went on the harder it was to do it. I have a back log of exposed film to get developed and hope to catch up soon.
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  4. #4

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    That's the best way to keep it, just be sure that it's in tight freezer packing with no moisture inside. Just be sure to give it long enough to thaw without condensing any moisture on it.

  5. #5
    jd callow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curt View Post
    I just developed negatives that I exposed while in Houston and Galveston the day after Katrina and before Rita. They developed perfectly with no bad effects. They were 5x7, for some reason I just didn't get around to developing them, the longer time went on the harder it was to do it. I have a back log of exposed film to get developed and hope to catch up soon.
    Curt,
    Glad to hear that you are catching up and hope your back log goes down soon. By some chance were your exposed negs frozen or stored in a different manner?
    Last edited by jd callow; 11-15-2007 at 02:15 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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  6. #6
    haziz's Avatar
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    What about freezing quickloads?

    What about exposed 4x5 sheets and exposed quickloads. Can they be frozen in a ziplock bag, maybe with a silica packet in the bag to absorb moisture before freezing?

    Thanks.

    Sincerely,

    Hany.

  7. #7

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    why would you freeze any film...??? refrigerator temps are best I believe.

  8. #8

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    I'm with Drew. I've always refrigerated but never froze film.

  9. #9
    gainer's Avatar
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    IIRC, exposed frozen film from an Arctic (or Antarctic) expedition was found, I think in the camera, developed, and had good images after several decades. Radiation would be more a problem than cold.
    Gadget Gainer

  10. #10
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    I keep film frozen until ready to load holders, or use the roll film. I always allow plenty of time, several hours, for the film to thaw prior to opening the container. If I didn't do this I would not still have Super XX to use when the situation demands it.

    As for exposed film, if I can not develop it within a week or so, it gets frozen in an evacuated plastic bag. It is allowed to thaw completely prior to opening the bag.

    As for silica gel, I don't use it because I believe it is better for the film to retain its original moisture instead of trying to remove it. If the bag is tightly sealed and all possible air removed, I don't think moisture is a problem. Of course, this assumes that several hours are allowed for film to return to room temperature.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

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