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  1. #41

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    I think the anti-dandruff shampoo in the U.K. in the 60s was called Selsun. Anyone remember it? Expensive but worked a treat. How about washing my hair in Selenium? Boy, do I need to increase it's Dmax. These days it's all highlight and no shadows.

    pentaxuser

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post
    I think the anti-dandruff shampoo in the U.K. in the 60s was called Selsun. Anyone remember it? Expensive but worked a treat. How about washing my hair in Selenium? Boy, do I need to increase it's Dmax. These days it's all highlight and no shadows.

    pentaxuser
    Selson Blue?- still available over here. The last thing I need is anything that will further thicken my head...

  3. #43
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    It contained a selenium sulfide compound. Thus the name selsun.

    PE

  4. #44

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    Outside?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kvistgaard View Post
    Don't forget that toning does not require the darkness of a, well, darkroom - you can just as well go outside to do the toning work.
    As for flushing used chemicals (photo or general household) down the drain or toilet: Where I live (Denmark), that is an absolute no-no.
    Outside? Only if you want to add interesting textures to your prints such as kamakaze flies, blossom, leaves, snow - depending on the season.

    Ritchie

  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by bonk View Post
    - TMAX fixer
    - Ilford Iflostop

    Especially the selenium toner
    and the fixer smell very...unhealthy.
    I think it is the SO2 produced by an acid
    fix which irritates. Asthmatics I believe are at
    risk in it's presence. Neutral to alkaline fixers
    are no problem although if of the ammonium
    type do smell so. A neutral to alkaline fix
    made with Sodium thiosulfate presents
    no problems. Dan

  6. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Hoskinson View Post
    “Pyrogallic acid is toxic but one must be careful in interpreting MSDS: mostly they are written for industrial users of substances who use and store them in very large quantity.
    This is terrible advice. An MSDS is just as valid for casual, low scale users, or chemical laboratories using small quantities, as it is for large scale industrial operations. In fact, an MSDS tells you just how relevant it is for low scale use vs. large scale use by virtue of the information on toxicity, acceptable exposure levels, reactivities, and the likes. It's full of very useful information.

    For example, using a couple of random example compounds: something like KCN (potassium cyanide) is very toxic (a gram or so can kill you if ingested), irritating, liberates toxic cyanide gas if heated or reacted with certain subjestances, etc. Potassium dichromate (a more relevant example for photographers) is acutely toxic and will give you cancer with repeated exposure to small amounts. These are all properties that would be relevant to you whether you've got 1 gram of it sitting in a bottle on your desk or a 10 ton vat of it sitting in a large scale industrial facility, and this information is all available in the appropriate MSDS.
    Last edited by walter23; 11-18-2007 at 08:43 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    The universe is a haunted house. -Coil
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  7. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post
    I think the anti-dandruff shampoo in the U.K. in the 60s was called Selsun. Anyone remember it? Expensive but worked a treat. How about washing my hair in Selenium? Boy, do I need to increase it's Dmax. These days it's all highlight and no shadows.

    pentaxuser
    Selenium sulphide. I've used it myself (in more concentrated form, to treat a mild skin condition).

    The issue here is whether or not the complex is a toxic form & whether or not the quantities are enough to be toxic. Obviously the selsun lotion / shampoo is relatively safe, but it's not the same as selenium toner in either concentration or other ingredients and possibly oxidation state of the selenium itself.
    The universe is a haunted house. -Coil
    .

  8. #48

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    IF you are a gent, or lady, who has genuine fear before even starting, do something else, you will hurt yourself.

    If you are a gent or lady, who is fearless, read some informative articles and give all its due respect.
    Stupidity has just rewards.

    If you are a gent or lady who is immune to damn near any thing, still let wisdom rule, but praise the lord, and give her hell.

    If you are a gent or lady, who is allergic, or subject to severe reactions to damn near anything, you can live a short full life or a long boring one. The choice is yours.

    In between the extremes is the majority of the populace, use your brain, and remember you have nothing to fear but fear itself.

    Bobby
    Last edited by BobbyR; 11-18-2007 at 09:45 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by walter23 View Post
    This is terrible advice. An MSDS is just as valid for casual, low scale users, or chemical laboratories using small quantities, as it is for large scale industrial operations. In fact, an MSDS tells you just how relevant it is for low scale use vs. large scale use by virtue of the information on toxicity, acceptable exposure levels, reactivities, and the likes. It's full of very useful information.
    I've examined several MSDSes, and I've got a couple of complaints about them, as a class:

    • Two organizations can put out different MSDSes for the same compound, and the two MSDSes can contain radically different information. This makes it difficult to correlate risks between different compounds if the MSDSes come from different sources -- if one source is more complete/alarmist than the other, you might come to mistaken ideas about the relative risks of the two compounds.
    • Some MSDSes are downright alarmist. I once did a Web search on MSDSes for water, just out of curiosity. Some were fairly reasonable, but I found one that was so complete in its listing of risks that it was almost as ridiculous as the joke DHMO sites. (Note for the uninitiated: DHMO is dihydrogen monoxide, aka water.) I didn't happen to save that particular MSDS or its URL, but it made water sound like pretty dangerous stuff. To the extent that other MSDSes are written in similar style, the result is likely to be unhelpful paranoia about specific chemicals and about chemicals in general.


    This is not to say that MSDSes should not be consulted, but these facts can make them difficult to interpret, particularly if you don't already know enough about the substance in question to not need the MSDS. So by all means, read them, but if something you read in an MSDS concerns you, research it some more; don't ban the substance from your darkroom or buy a hazmat suit or something.

  10. #50
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    That is why the LD50 in rats, mice and rabbits is somewhat useful and is what I use from the Merck index.

    PE

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