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  1. #11

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    Ron, were you not wearing that very tie in Montana? I have to say, "You don't look a day older than those pictures of you in 1947".

    Mike, having done this a few times myself, I can stress (as Matt pointed out) that trying it out on a real roll of 120, with real images and real developer, is worth the trouble. I was quite surprised at how much a "dry" run helps when working in the dark with slippery film. I did a roll of Ansco All Weather Pan 616 about a year ago, in Rodinal, as I recall, because it was at hand. I used an old, cracked, taped up FR tank, and did some damage to the film in loading (very brittle). I have another roll around here somewhere (unexposed).

    Good luck. You will be all set to do the rolls of 118 or122 you will probably find next.

    Cheers,
    Clarence

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by CRhymer View Post
    Ron, were you not wearing that very tie in Montana? I have to say, "You don't look a day older than those pictures of you in 1947".

    Mike, having done this a few times myself, I can stress (as Matt pointed out) that trying it out on a real roll of 120, with real images and real developer, is worth the trouble. I was quite surprised at how much a "dry" run helps when working in the dark with slippery film. I did a roll of Ansco All Weather Pan 616 about a year ago, in Rodinal, as I recall, because it was at hand. I used an old, cracked, taped up FR tank, and did some damage to the film in loading (very brittle). I have another roll around here somewhere (unexposed).

    Good luck. You will be all set to do the rolls of 118 or122 you will probably find next.

    Cheers,
    Clarence
    Clarence;

    I bought a new tie in 1963 after I left the Air Force. I was forced to get a new one for Kodak. Just think, I wore it for 32 years.

    PE

  3. #13
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    The tie and white shirt would stop anything!

    Seriously, I knew you would catch that. And, the reason is that it was optional, but also because the films of that era were not as hard as those currently manufactured.

    But, AAMOF, I use a stop bath with my hand coatings and it works just fine.

    PE
    Tee hee! How come the hardening in the emulsion a contributing factor to the importance of stop? Is a more hardened emulsion retaining more developer, hence requiring a stop bath for fast and thorough stopping? Or was it that the pinholes due to carbonate dev+acid stop were a reality back then?
    Using film since before it was hip.


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  4. #14
    Murray Kelly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Guys;

    Here is Kodak's pictorial demo from their B&W manual published in 1947, the first year I did my own processing.

    I hope this helps.

    PE
    GEEZ! Does that take me back? I would get my folks to call out the minutes from the next room. I had the pantry with towels along the door. A bit later - 1949 at a guess.

    Murray

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhv View Post
    Tee hee! How come the hardening in the emulsion a contributing factor to the importance of stop? Is a more hardened emulsion retaining more developer, hence requiring a stop bath for fast and thorough stopping? Or was it that the pinholes due to carbonate dev+acid stop were a reality back then?
    Early film and paper emulsions could form blisters (not pinholes) from stop during this rough treatment. It has been reported in very old texts and that is how the story has continued to the present day and how it is applied to modern products.

    PE

  6. #16
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    I remember lots of things from my early days. A Bullet, or was it Bullseye, Brownie that used 127 film, a cardboard flashbulb reflector, a walk-in closet with ruby bulb, but no tie. I didn't get to wear a tie until I was about 16. Even so, I got to see the miracle of contact prints on Velox paper coming up in a soup bowl or some other dish. Who timed film development? You could see the image coming up under the red light as you see-sawed it through the soup. I always wondered why we called it "soup". Timing contact prints was "1 mississippi, 2 mississippi-etc.
    Gadget Gainer

  7. #17
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    Ah, yes---Velox paper and ortho film.

    Anyone else here start out with the Kodak "Tri-Chem-Pak", that came with developer ("Universal M-Q", as I recall--good for both film and paper), stop bath, and fixer, and a little package of 2-1/2 x 3-1/2 inch Velox paper?

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by greybeard View Post
    Anyone else here start out with the Kodak "Tri-Chem-Pak", that came with developer ("Universal M-Q", as I recall--good for both film and paper), stop bath, and fixer, and a little package of 2-1/2 x 3-1/2 inch Velox paper?
    That is probably what I started with (or something similar), but I cannot remember for sure.

    I was, after all, eleven years old at the time

    Matt

  9. #19
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    Actually, the early developers came in test tubes with cork stoppers. You pulled out a stopper and dissolved the first chemical, then pulled the second one and etc.... It was great.

    The bigger packs came in glass jars with paper cannisters inside. You dissolved the cannister (or the chemical in the jar) and then vice versa. It was a great time.

    Our local pharmacist and our radio repair shop carried these chemicals as there was no such thing as a 'photo store' then.

    PE

  10. #20
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    Our local pharmacist was a photo hobbyist and carried a wide range of photo supplies. I seem to remember getting my first taste of Varigam at his place. I still have a Varigam filter or two.
    Gadget Gainer

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