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  1. #1

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    Dip & dunk 616 film.

    I would like to have a go at this method to develop my "found film".Can't really find anything on the net.Would someone kindly point me to a site which would guide me,step by step,in this process.

    Much Thanks

  2. #2

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    Good Morning, Mike,

    I understand that back in the days of orthochromatic film, the dip and dunk method was commonly used since it could be done under a red safelight. The idea is simply to have a tray of chemicals through which the film, held in a catenary curve shape, is passed back and forth until development is complete. Stop and fix would follow the same approach. This method becomes rather awkward with panchromatic film since a safelight can't be used, but I suppose that, with care, it can be done. Sorry I can't give any practical hints; by the time I got involved in photography, only pan film was generally available, and the tank/reel system was in use.

    Konical

  3. #3

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    Older Kodak How to Take Good Pictures books from the 40's and early 50's provide instuctions on how see saw roll film though trays.

  4. #4
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    This film has presumably been on the roll for quite some time, so it may be a bit curly and difficult to handle by the seesaw method. A presoak might help (seesaw through plain water plus a bit of wetting agent for a minute or so).

    The technique isn't all that hard to do, but it seems to work best if you use a fairly narrow tray (5x7, working across the short dimension) and let the film "ride" (gently!) against the inside bottom corners. Letting the film ride across the tray this way gives you some tactile feedback so that you don't end up seesawing it through the air above the developer. Presumably, you could also just use a deep enough tank to be sure that you don't wander away from the solution (this is in total darkness, remember). The ultimate deep tank would be a piece of plastic pipe with a cap on the far end; the tradeoff is developer volume versus manipulation skill. Given that the film is essentially irreplaceable, you might want to just invest in some pipe, a few caps, and lots of chemicals.

    There are (or were) adjustable-reel tanks that would take these old film sizes. You might find one used, but back in the day they weren't all that easy to load, and given the film-curl issue, they probably wouldn't work any better today.

  5. #5

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    Thanks Greybeard,
    The film is very brittle so I shall do a presoak.Lots of trays and chemicals.Think I'll go with HC-110.
    Care to ballpark a time for developing Ansco All Weather Pan in dilution H (1:63)?

    Mike

  6. #6
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    How it is done

    Guys;

    Here is Kodak's pictorial demo from their B&W manual published in 1947, the first year I did my own processing.

    I hope this helps.

    PE
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails processing film demo.jpg  

  7. #7

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    Fantastic Photo Engineer !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    I shall post the results (if anything comes out).

    Mike

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Guys;

    Here is Kodak's pictorial demo from their B&W manual published in 1947, the first year I did my own processing.

    I hope this helps.

    PE
    One point - it is absolutely imperative that while doing this you wear a white dress shirt and tie, as pictured

    Matt

    P.S. the last time I did this, it was with 616 film, and I was 40 years younger.

    P.P.S. You may want to waste a roll of 120 film and practice this first - but don't just use water, because the developer is much more slippery than water.

  9. #9
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Guys;

    Here is Kodak's pictorial demo from their B&W manual published in 1947, the first year I did my own processing.

    I hope this helps.

    PE

    Oups! They did not recommend a stop bath...
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

    My APUG Portfolio

  10. #10
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    The tie and white shirt would stop anything!

    Seriously, I knew you would catch that. And, the reason is that it was optional, but also because the films of that era were not as hard as those currently manufactured.

    But, AAMOF, I use a stop bath with my hand coatings and it works just fine.

    PE

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