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  1. #1

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    I'm sorting thru some old prints I made in the 70's while in high school. I must embarrassingly admit that apparantly I didn't get the fix out as there are a few prints with yellow 1/2" circular stains. As well, the edges have begun to brown. Is this normal for edges to brown in older prints? Haven't tried yet, but will a hypo and wash take out the yellow stains? I'll probably do it anyway for peace of mind and before storing them in my new acid free box.

    Thanks for any tips,
    Chris

  2. #2
    Les McLean's Avatar
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    Chris,

    I'd say your prints are probably beyond recovery. The stain is there because of insufficent fixing and to my knowledge cannot be recovered. If the image area is not stained because you have left border around it you can crop off the border which may help stop the brown staining from reaching the image area. Sorry I couldn't give a more positive reply.

    "Digital circuits are made from analogue parts"
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    Website: www.lesmcleanphotography.com

  3. #3
    Eric Rose's Avatar
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    Geez I hate those yellow stains.

    But on a photographic note I did lots of newpaper work in the 70's and we used an Ilford B&W stabilization processor. All of my old prints that I kept from that machine have turned yellow. I do understand however that the prints from this process were never meant to be permanent. However prints that I made using the usual processes are still looking great.

    You might be able to tone them and just tell everyone you thought the funky blue was really cool in the 70's. LOL
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    "civility is not a sign of weakness" JFK

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  4. #4

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    That's what I feared. It's not *too* bad so far, so hopefully rewashing will prevent further deteriation. And yes Les, there is border to cut. I'll do that as well.

    Thanks guys!

  5. #5

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    Chris,

    I do a lot of restoration work for clients. If the prints are really important to you, I'd suggest reshooting them with a yellow filter and the reprinting them onto FB and then reprocessing, toning, etc for archival purposes.

    You could also rewash the prints and trim off the yellowing, if it's in the edges...

  6. #6

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    I never did get 'into' toning back then, so maybe that's part of my problem too. This subjects long gone, so reshooting isn't an option. But cutting the edges off will help alot. And I will rewash and tone. Thanks Doc.

  7. #7
    lee
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    I think Doc is\was talking about copying them with a yellow filter. The theory is that the yellow filter will filter the yellow and photograph it as white then you will have copy negs to print on fiber. If it were me I might not want to spend too much time on this project. Live and learn. BUT, if I were I would use my big camera and make 4x5 negs.


    lee\c

  8. #8
    lee
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    Eric,
    The stabilization process used a developer incorporated into the emulsion and the processor used a chemical that activated the the developer. Had those prints dropped into a tray of fixer they, most likely, would look as good as the regular shots from that period. Not fixing the prints is as bad a deal for photographic emulsions as not washing the prints properly, IMO. And you are right the stabilization stuff was not meant to last.

    lee\c

  9. #9

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    I gather you don't still have the negs?

  10. #10
    DKT
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    Try Ilford's Ortho Plus if you have access to a 4x5 camera and plan on copying them. Next to Kodak's discontinued Pro Copy, Ortho + is about the best copy film there is, if you don't need any red sensitivity. The best way to do it, is not to use a yellow filter, but rather a blue filter--or an ortho film. The blue sensivity helps extract detail out of the faded image. You use your processing to shift the contrast around as needed. I copy faded images all the time at the museum where I work, and we use either Ortho + or TMX in 4x5. We use wratten 25 and 47B and some green filters, but only the yellow filters for copying newspaper stock basically. You have to look at the stain and decide what you can do, but most of the time, you're dealing with a faded yellow image, and the ortho film can work miracles practically on it. If the image has alot of inherent reddish/brown tones--like old POP prints--we use TMX and push it...same concept as regular shooting--exposure gives you density/dev for contrast. Orhto + only comes in 4x5 or 8x10, but for yellowed prints, it can't be beat. fwiw, alot of folks use a yellow (or amber) filter when they dupe old negs if the base is stained when making the interpositives. They use a pan film for this, and then an ortho copy film for the dupe neg.

    KT

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