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  1. #21
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Just use 2% acetic acid stop with about 10 grams / liter of sodium sulfite (any kind) in it. This is not an exact requirement, just an extra sulfite bath of any sort to remove the developer.

    If you are using alkaline fix, then just put some extra sulfite into the fix and use a good rinse instead of the stop.

    I'm very happy my advice was useful. Thanks.

    PE

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by dslater View Post
    But even with the scrubbing, don't the trays eventually get dis-colored with a stain that won't scrub off and doesn't get on the prints?
    Probably...if you rub your finger on the tray and your finger isn't black, it probably won't get on the print.

    But our trays are stainless steel (SS). We have been using the same trays since before I started to use the darkroom in 1977 (the trays are marked "Humboldt State College" and we became "Humboldt State University" in 1973.) Still not a stain on them. SS trays are expensive -- but no plastic tray would last 30+ years of continious student use (125 to 150 students per semester)!

    Vaughn

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    Probably...if you rub your finger on the tray and your finger isn't black, it probably won't get on the print.

    But our trays are stainless steel (SS). We have been using the same trays since before I started to use the darkroom in 1977 (the trays are marked "Humboldt State College" and we became "Humboldt State University" in 1973.) Still not a stain on them. SS trays are expensive -- but no plastic tray would last 30+ years of continious student use (125 to 150 students per semester)!

    Vaughn
    SS trays - that sounds great - to bad they cost an arm and a leg - I bet they look as good as when they were new. When I got my enlarger, the seller threw in a bunch of trays - most plastic and too dirty to revive. However 3 of them were those old ceramic covered trays - for all their age, there's not a spot of stain on them. I don't really use them for processing because the flat bottom makes them too difficult to use. I do use one of them for photo-flo so I don't have to worry about the photo-flo sticking to my plastic trays.

    Dan
    Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery;None but ourselves can free our minds. - Bob Marley

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by dslater View Post
    However 3 of them were those old ceramic covered trays - Dan
    Porcelain. I've some hard rubber and a glass tray. I think
    the deposits in the developer tray may have nothing to
    do with the processing of prints although that may
    hasten the staining. I've not tested it but believe
    it possible that those deposits derive from the
    chemistry itself.

    Just what are those deposits' chemical composition?
    Likely no silver. If there were any silver in those deposits
    I'd think silver salt solvency and solvent developer
    chemistries and then worry about mushy grain,
    loss of highlight detail, and ... .

    By way of comparison, how well do plastic trays score
    when used with sulfite free developers; Ascorbate
    based developers? Stain free with vitamin C? Dan

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    By way of comparison, how well do plastic trays score when used with sulfite free developers; Ascorbate based developers? Stain free with vitamin C? Dan
    Agfa advertised that its Neutol Plus print developer, which is a phenidone/ascorbate developer, would not stain trays. I've never used it, though, so I can neither confirm nor deny this claim.

    I mostly use phenidone/ascorbate print developers for B&W these days (E-72, DS-14, and Tektol). My print developer tray had already acquired some slight stains from using Dektol, though, and I also develop RA-4 color in the same tray, so I don't know how much of the continuing increase in stains is from my B&W developers and how much from the RA-4 developer. I suspect that the RA-4 is doing a lot more staining than the B&W developers, but I'm not 100% sure of that. Perhaps one day I'll get another tray to use only for my B&W developers....

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marco B View Post
    Hi, Initially, these were not visible, but gradually became
    visible during the washing cycle. Marco
    Same here. OK through the developer and fix then
    some hue ensues; my testing with less than adequate
    fix. No pink or close though. I've studio proofs from the
    40s with still visible image which are very red-ish.
    No fix at all likely.

    A slight under fixing leaves a trace of silver evenly
    distributed with in the emulsion. On short exposure to
    light it is soon reduced to metallic; might be thought of
    as a POP with highlight density through out.

    Now about that ferrOcyanide. I don't agree. It's silver
    salt is not very stable. In a nut shell, that ferrO form will
    convert to ANY of the halides; usually the bromide when
    sepia toning. IIRC it was Mr. Rudman who pointed out
    that ANY of the halides or a mix can be used with
    or after the use of ferricyanide.

    Every salt of silver is soluble with the use of thiosulfate;
    the iodide and sulfide being two of the very least soluble
    salts. A silver image converted to silver ferrOcyanide
    maintains it's integrity because of it's insolubility in
    solutions lacking solvent action. Dan

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