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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by bdial View Post
    You could load a foot or so of the bulk film onto a reel and process it and see if it's fogged.
    i was going to suggest that

    don't even expose the film in a camera,
    just clip a bit off and process it.
    maybe somehow your film is shot ( as in bad )

    i only shoot expired film ( color, black and white, slides and xp2 ).
    sometimes it looses a bit of contrast - but most of the time it is a-ok.

    sorry to hear of your troubles

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by bdial View Post
    You could load a foot or so of the bulk film onto a reel and process it and see if it's fogged.
    That's a great idea, I have like 9 rolls of it left, I could do a foot from each and somehow keep track of which roll goes with which foot of film and make sure they're alright. I think if I put thin strips of like masking tape on the outside of the canisters I could tell by how many strips of tape there are which roll it is by feel.
    Thanks bdial!

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by jono1515 View Post
    That's a great idea, I have like 9 rolls of it left, I could do a foot from each and somehow keep track of which roll goes with which foot of film and make sure they're alright. I think if I put thin strips of like masking tape on the outside of the canisters I could tell by how many strips of tape there are which roll it is by feel.
    Commercial photofinishers stick labels onto their film with serial numbers on them to help them match up each roll with each customer. You could do something similar -- prepare masking tape with numbers, stick it on each canister and each film snip, and then process it. (I'd test to be sure whatever pen you use has ink that doesn't come off in your process, though. Sharpies work for me on the backs of prints, so I'd expect them to work well in this role, too.)

  4. #14

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    mystery film

    Years ago I was given a bulk film loader and several cassettes, some of which contained film. The person who gave them to me told me the film was long expired at that time. A few days ago I found these loaded cassettes and decided to see what might, or might not, happen if I exposed a few frames. The only cassette with any writing said T-max written in ink on the label. I guessed at 100 speed a took a few shots, developed them in HC-110 dil B for 6 minutes, and some of the results are attached. Scanner is a flatbed, no touching up with any software. What would you do regarding exposing what is left of this roll? I'm just doing it for fun.
    Last edited by like2fiddle; 05-19-2009 at 10:05 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Roger

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