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  1. #11
    georgegrosu's Avatar
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    I have same tests with B&W positive film in-camera like negativ and slide.
    Negativ have 3 - 4 ISO – see images.
    Slide have 50 ISO.
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  2. #12
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Hey, that's great! You should try a portrait now and see what the skin colour looks like.

    What method did you use to do the slide? Reversal processing?
    Using film since before it was hip.


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  3. #13
    georgegrosu's Avatar
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    Michel, B&W positive film in-camera like negative have only 3 - 4 ISO and a spectral sensitivity very little and is incredible the images you see with the positive film. I like the quality of images and I work very much for discover the developer and the parameters. Is not an easy work, but when I see the pictures I can go before. If you want see the crop with picture of dog: http://membres.lycos.fr/georgegrosu/...0rezolutie.htm .
    B&W positive film in-camera is difficult with peoples (see pictures).
    With the reversal processing me don t has a similar quality like the negative processing (for B&W positive film), but I have a good sensitivity (25 – 50 ISO) and I think I can change same think. Reversal images are not bad, but the scan is not good.
    The negative and reversal processing I work with chemicals (not kit).
    George
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  4. #14

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    I recently used 5302, developed in Agfa Multicontrast liquid developer, to make high contrast internegatives from high contrast interpositives (made from a low contrast B&W negative), which were used in a multi-enlarger multi-image print. The Multicontrast developer was diluted 1:9, which is 2x the dilution recommended for paper, namely 1:4. High contrast was what I was after.

    If I wanted to make a normal contrast internegative from a normal contrast positive transparancy, I would try a low contrast developer, like Kodak D-23. It should be noted that 5302 was designed to make motion picture release prints from negatives, which would (or should) have been developed to a Contrast Index (CI) of something like 0.55 to 0.60.

    I don't know for sure what the recommended CI for the 5302 is, but one way of thinking of it is that if you had a B&W negative, with the above CI (0.55-0.60) you wished to print on B&W paper, the paper is developed to (by film standards) a very high contrast. If you start with a transparency, which has a very high contrast, something like a CI of 1.2 to 1.4, then you will need a low density range (low contrast) internegative.

    The contrast of the final product (your B&W print) is the product of the CI of the original (the Scala slide), multiplied by the CI of the internegative (on 5302 film), multiplied by the CI of the B&W paper you print the internegative on. If all of that sounds like a lot, it is. I made internegaives and interpositives for years, for very picky clients, from a range of originals, for a whole universe of different applications. The uses ranged from press release photos, to large murals made from aerial negatives. Sometimes (not often) we got originals with embedded gray scales, which made the development adjustments for contrast control easier to calculate...but not easy to calculate.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by analogfotog View Post

    .........

    If I wanted to make a normal contrast internegative from a normal contrast positive transparancy, I would try a low contrast developer, like Kodak D-23. It should be noted that 5302 was designed to make motion picture release prints from negatives, which would (or should) have been developed to a Contrast Index (CI) of something like 0.55 to 0.60.

    I don't know for sure what the recommended CI for the 5302 is, but one way of thinking of it is that if you had a B&W negative, with the above CI (0.55-0.60) you wished to print on B&W paper, the paper is developed to (by film standards) a very high contrast. If you start with a transparency, which has a very high contrast, something like a CI of 1.2 to 1.4, then you will need a low density range (low contrast) internegative.

    .........
    The 5302 should be developed to a CI of 2.6 for theatrical release print. It is because original negative has a CI about 0.6 and the printing processing will give 0.6 X 2.6 to about 1.5 viewing contrast of the release print.

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