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  1. #1

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    Developing Oddity--Any Experienced Answers?

    I feel strange having to ask this because it is the first roll of film I have ever had that did not turn out okay. So, I just developed a roll of Tri-x, 35mm, which is my primary film. When I pulled it off the reel it had numerous milky white patches running across the length of the film. They were not clear like unexposed film, nor were they black like a light leak. This leads me to think it was a problem with either the film or the chemicals. I'm leaning toward the film because I developed a roll of HP5+ just prior to this and it is fine. The only difference between the two rolls was that I mixed fresh developer for the second roll (tri-x), as I use DDX one shot. Still, the concentrate was from the same bottle and the distilled water was also from the same bottle. All procedures were the same as I have been using for a long time. Oh, I also poured the stop and fixer back into their respective storage bottles after the first roll to insure that the chemicals used for the second roll were "replenished." Also, the negatives look normal otherwise, i.e. the film was exposed and shows all the normal photographic detail, just with milky patches over the film. Any thoughts?

  2. #2
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    If development seemed fine even in the milky patches, you probably underfixed.

    If development was similarly blotchy, the film was probably not wound properly onto its reel and part of the film was touching other parts, preventing proper chemical contact with the emulsion.
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

  3. #3
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    Probably incomplete fixation for one reason or another. Get the film back into the fixer ASAP and then rewash and treat with photo flo.

    Looks like your film was in contact with itself front to back, or was not fully developed and fixed somehow.

    PE

  4. #4

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    Thanks for the replies. The film was not stuck together and the development was fine, even in the white patches, so I don't think the film was touching. Based on your responses, I guess it was not fixed all the way. Strange, as the fixing procedure was the same for the HP5+ that I processed a few minutes before and the fixer is pretty fresh, but I guess anything can happen when dealing with chemicals and other variables.

    I went to re-fix it and, like an idiot, dropped it on the floor, so it now has debris stuck in the emusion. I promptly threw it out. Luckily, there were no important photos on the roll. It was just playing around with the camera, so nothing lost really. Perhaps I learned a couple lessons.

  5. #5

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    it always amazes me the mistakes you can make in a darkroom and still get good images

    once I accidentally took the top of the tank with the film still in developer ( under room lights )

    I quickly poured out the developer and poured in stop bath

    when the roll was finished, I couldn't see anything wrong with it

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by jmal View Post
    Thanks for the replies. The film was not stuck together and the development was fine, even in the white patches, so I don't think the film was touching. Based on your responses, I guess it was not fixed all the way. Strange, as the fixing procedure was the same for the HP5+ that I processed a few minutes before and the fixer is pretty fresh, but I guess anything can happen when dealing with chemicals and other variables.

    I went to re-fix it and, like an idiot, dropped it on the floor, so it now has debris stuck in the emusion. I promptly threw it out. Luckily, there were no important photos on the roll. It was just playing around with the camera, so nothing lost really. Perhaps I learned a couple lessons.

    I just started fixing the leaders of my film in a seperate container (at the same time) just to make sure I've got it right. Anyone elso doing this ?

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by j4425 View Post
    I just started fixing the leaders of my film in a seperate
    container (at the same time) just to make sure I've got
    it right. Anyone elso doing this ?
    There's no bothering with fixer testing when it is used very
    dilute one-shot. Add 20ml per roll of concentrate to the amount
    of water needed plus 3 or 4 minutes processing. Fresh fixer every
    roll. Dump when done.

    Straight sodium thiosulfate is my fix, film or paper. Near an ounce,
    25 grams, in the needed volume of water and 10 minutes does well
    with Acros and likely a few other slow to medium speed films.

    Sodium thiosulfate lasts and lasts. A good choice for the
    occasional darkroom worker. I wonder weather it ever
    goes bad? Dan

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by j4425 View Post
    I just started fixing the leaders of my film in a seperate container (at the same time) just to make sure I've got it right. Anyone elso doing this ?
    I usually do this just before i begin the whole development process and then i write down my fixing time.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    There's no bothering with fixer testing when it is used very
    dilute one-shot. Add 20ml per roll of concentrate to the amount
    of water needed plus 3 or 4 minutes processing. Fresh fixer every
    roll. Dump when done.

    Straight sodium thiosulfate is my fix, film or paper. Near an ounce,
    25 grams, in the needed volume of water and 10 minutes does well
    with Acros and likely a few other slow to medium speed films.

    Sodium thiosulfate lasts and lasts. A good choice for the
    occasional darkroom worker. I wonder weather it ever
    goes bad? Dan
    I'm tight so I like to reuse my chemicals as much as i can so i have to know the fixing time for 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th hand fixer. I rarely go above 5 uses though.



 

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