Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,507   Posts: 1,543,551   Online: 1051
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 30
  1. #11
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,286
    Images
    301
    I would say that FP4+ has inherently more contrast than HP5+. I would probably try Delta 100 for a medium speed emulsion to use alongside HP5+. Trying to be objective here. To me FP4+ is more like Tri-X in how it renders contrast, that is - more of it!
    That can, of course, be cured by changing your development regimen to a degree. I usually dilute my developer more when I process FP4+ to cut contrast.

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  2. #12
    GeoffHill's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Newcastle, England
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    298
    Images
    8
    All of the films you have listed will give good results, but if you are often shooting HP5 at 1600, why not try Delta3200. It'll probably give better results at higher speeds

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,055
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Krueger View Post
    Can you elaborate on the different look? I don't mean to hijack the thread, but I was wondering about how Efke and Foma films look as compared to Ilford films particularly in terms of graininess.

    I haven't tried Foma films, but the Efke 25 is less (???) sensitive to red; you'll have to put a deeper red filter on the lens to get the sky to come out bluer than with ordinary pan films.

    Efke films are generally considered to be grainier, but I've only tried the 25 and in medium format, so grain wasn't a big issue.

    Describing the "look" is difficult. I just really clicked with this emulsion with Pyrocat HD. It fell right into place on the first roll. You just have to get past the QC problems: pieces of emulsion missing and light leaks around the paper backing.

    all I can really say is to try it and see if you like it.

  4. #14
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,281
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by jim appleyard View Post
    I haven't tried Foma films, but the Efke 25 is less (???) sensitive to red; you'll have to put a deeper red filter on the lens to get the sky to come out bluer than with ordinary pan films. ...
    If you put a deep red filter on EFKE 25, you won't get anything. The film is almost orthochromatic, which means it's not sensitive to deep red at all!

    If an orange filter doesn't give you dark enough skies, use a different film.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  5. #15
    JBrunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    6,780
    FWIW I find FP-4 easier to handle in the darkroom, and easier to get the bullet proof negs I favor.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Chicago, Western Suburbs
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,437
    Dear Arkady,

    It seems that Delta needs at one more supporter. Delta 100 will give you as smooth a print as you will ever see. Unless you are a graded paper person, the "new emulsion" products are no more difficult to use than the old. My main suggestion is to avoid the desire to overexpose and overdevelop.

    Try Delta (in any flavor), you'll like it.

    Neal Wydra

  7. #17

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Daventry, Northamptonshire, England
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    6,962
    Quote Originally Posted by GeoffHill View Post
    All of the films you have listed will give good results, but if you are often shooting HP5 at 1600, why not try Delta3200. It'll probably give better results at higher speeds
    I'll second that. Developed in Perceptol, even at box speed the shadow detail isn't bad and the prints are remarkable grain free at up to 5, x8.

    pentaxuser

  8. #18
    keithwms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,079
    Blog Entries
    20
    Images
    129
    My own feelings: fp4+ is quite close in tonal character to hp5+. Delta and acros strike me as less inherently contrasty-they are both smooth in a way that can give the impression of softness. The graininess of hp/fp can give an impression of edge sharpness that I think enhances texture. I find it easier to get an edgier, earthy tone with hp and fp, and easier to get a more abstract and dreamy tone with the low speed deltas and acros.

    After trying fp4+ in 5x7 I am totally sold on the film. I loved it already in medium format, but in 5x7... you get supersmooth edges and that contrasty character. That was probably the first time I ever (contact) printed a neg and didn't immediately want to try again at a different grade. For me, it's simply right in the pocket.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,055
    Thanks, Ole!

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    196
    Fp4+ great in D(761+1) too.
    I like Delta 100 in Rodinal(1+50) too.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin