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  1. #11
    noseoil's Avatar
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    Sandy, do you think the change in A & B parts is affecting the development densities at differing tonal ranges in some of the above posts, or is it more a matter of dilutions and agitations? I understand why you have altered the A & B ratios for stain. tim

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    Quote Originally Posted by noseoil View Post
    Sandy, do you think the change in A & B parts is affecting the development densities at differing tonal ranges in some of the above posts, or is it more a matter of dilutions and agitations? I understand why you have altered the A & B ratios for stain. tim
    Tim,

    The slight increase in the amount of A solution serves to reduce oxidation, which in turn lowers B+F stain. Probably not significant if you are printing with silver processes.

    Sandy

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    Quote Originally Posted by sanking View Post

    For most of my own work with both sheet film and roll film I personally use a type of development that I have called Extreme Minimal, that is, agitation for 1.5 minutes at the beginning, and then for ten seconds at the 1/4, 1/2 and 3/4 points of total development time. The dilution that I use is 1.5:1:200.
    That's what I do. I've just been calling it something else. Interesting that your dilution is just about what I have been using.

    Do you vary the solution A to B ratio to yield greater contrast or to provide compensating development in extremely high SBR situations?

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    Quote Originally Posted by c6h6o3 View Post
    That's what I do. I've just been calling it something else. Interesting that your dilution is just about what I have been using.

    Do you vary the solution A to B ratio to yield greater contrast or to provide compensating development in extremely high SBR situations?

    The primary reason that I vary the A to B ratio is to reduce B+F stain. Since I work with alternative processes my development times are much longer than for silver. Longer development times with any pryo developer results in greater oxidation and general stain. Increasing the amount of A relative to B reduces oxidation.

    As I mentioned earlier, this probably is not of any importance if you develop for silver printing, since development times are much shorter.

    Ordinarily I test for SBR with BTZS testing and adjust for subject brightness by varying the time of development rather than changing the dilution. However, there are times, say with extreme SBR conditions of -10 or more, when varyying the dilution may work better than a change in temperature.


    Sandy King
    Last edited by sanking; 12-19-2007 at 08:31 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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