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  1. #51
    Andy K's Avatar
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    Here's a question, if I was to put red gel film over my kitchen window, would that do away with the need for a blackout curtain (for enlarging)?


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    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  2. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy K View Post
    Here's a question, if I was to put red gel film over my kitchen window, would that do away with the need for a blackout curtain (for enlarging)?
    Perhaps some ruby lith? That's a great idea, Andy! I wonder if it would work...

    - Justin

  3. #53
    richard ide's Avatar
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    I don't think rubylith would be enough. I used 24 x 48 flourescent (4 tube) fixtures as safelights. I had 2 layers of red acrylic, and IRRC 3 layers of ruby and had to be very careful with VC paper or it would fog. Daylight is a lot brighter.
    Richard

    Why are there no speaker jacks on a stereo camera?

  4. #54
    Andy K's Avatar
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    I was wondering because I think I read somewhere that that was how it was done in the the earliest days before electric lighting was common. A red glass window was closed while setting up a contact print, handling paper etc. Then the contact frame would be held up to the window and the red window opened allowing white light to expose the contact print.


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  5. #55
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy K View Post
    I was wondering because I think I read somewhere that that was how it was done in the the earliest days before electric lighting was common. A red glass window was closed while setting up a contact print, handling paper etc. Then the contact frame would be held up to the window and the red window opened allowing white light to expose the contact print.
    The low speed of contact printing material probably helped back then. But rubylith and then some sort of cloth covering that needs only to be semi-opaquic would probably work. Any light that did come in would be red...but not at full daylight-strength.

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  6. #56
    Mike Té's Avatar
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    This thread should be stickied...

    This thread should be a sticky... the stories are perennial.

    My favourite story of this type is one Maris told us about last August:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum48/4...tml#post502233

    I still get cramps from laughing...
    Michael Robert Taylor
    Ottawa

    I wish I'D said that.... Bartlett

    http://www.apug.org/gallery1/browsei...imageuser=7358

  7. #57
    bennoj's Avatar
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    If I go more than 2 weeks without being in the darkroom, I'm pretty sure to make one of the following mistakes (I use a rental darkroom):

    Forget to stop down the enlarging lens after checking focus (#1 most common mistake I make)
    Forget to have either my PDA or the product information sheets available to know the right proportions to mix paper/film developer or toner.
    Forget to bring glasses so I can actually use the grain focuser (and read incredibly tiny print on bottles of chemicals)
    Forget to turn off the annoying beep on the timer
    Forget to bring a new bottle of chemicals (fix, more often than not)
    Bring film, forget to bring development tank (I have yet to bring the tanks but not the film, no doubt it will happen eventually)

    Now if we want to get into mistakes made while shooting a large-format camera, we'll need a whole 'nother thread...
    Benno Jones
    Seattle, WA

  8. #58
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    I have on more than one occasion had a sheet of large format film get stuck in the film holder. In the effort to extract it, I have tugged vigorously enough that when it came free, it flew out of my hand and on to the darkroom floor. Worse, I had a whole stack of sheets in a box where I was offloading them from the holders, and knocked the box over and spilled the film all over the floor. Playing 52 pickup with sheetfilm scattered across the darkroom floor is NO FUN.

  9. #59

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    Here's a question, if I was to put red gel film over my kitchen window, would that do away with the need for a blackout curtain (for enlarging)
    Way back when I heard of a (US) military darkroom that had windows with gel filters over them that worked quite successfully according to those who had worked there. I never saw it for myself though.

    As for developing with fixer, fixing with developer, knocking stacks of sheet film on the floor, wet film on the floor, forgetting the VC filters, etc. Been there done that, still doing it occasionally.

    I wonder what are the chances that the first person who cross-processed a roll of e-6 did it on purpose?

  10. #60
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    Great thread.

    My screw-ups include:
    - not mixing up enough developer for the film I'm processing. The last time I did it I realized it, agitated like crap while I madly mixed up some more developer (try that, it's not easy!). Surprisingly both rolls turned out alright; I was fast enough and the extra agitation helped a bunch.
    - trying to load two rolls of 120 onto a reel. I really cannot do this. Every once in awhile I convince myself that it can't be that hard, but yes, it is. I always ruin a few frames on each roll as the films overlap. (And I'm not a total klutz; I put a roll of 120 onto a metal reel on my very first attempt - I never even practiced in the light first.)
    - once in awhile I trust old developer when I should really know better. If in doubt, chuck it out. Thankfully this is getting to be a rare event.
    - the phone thing - my mom phoned me once while I was tray developing 4x5. Oops. At least the phone was across the room. I cowered close to the developer tray and the damage was minimal. I used to have a TDMA phone that had a mode where you could turn off its lights; I sure wish I could find a GSM phone with that option. I'd make it my darkroom phone.
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?



 

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