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  1. #11
    Andrew Moxom's Avatar
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    From what I have heard, this paper has like an eggshell type look to it. It's officially called a silk. Not unlike the old portriga or original Oriental warmtone grade paper (not the newer crappier version!) Or put another way, it could be compared with the Forte Polywamtone semi matt.

  2. #12

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    The "silk" Slavich Bromoportrait papers have a texture that's similar to what was common in the 1970s -- a coarse (by photographic standards) pseudo-fabric pattern. The pattern is definitely coarser than real silk, but the finish has a softer feel to it than the coarse fabrics that it visually resembles. I'm guessing that's why they call it "silk" rather than, say, "denim." The gloss could have something to do with it, too; although the paper is textured, it's got a glossy finish. It's definitely unusual by modern standards, which is at least part of the appeal. You can give photos a very distinctive "retro" look by using this paper.

  3. #13
    Gary Holliday's Avatar
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    I have been informed that it is more akin to canvas rather than the watercolour paper finishes that I use.

  4. #14
    Andrew Moxom's Avatar
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    Now I am definitely intrigued about it's texture. I guess I'll have to wait till tomorrow to find out!

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Ullsmith View Post
    The test Andrew is put a drop of solution B (or some
    activatorfrom a sepia kit, essentially NaOH) on an exposed
    strip. No reaction or weak reaction indicates no developers
    present in the emulsion, and should lith. This according to
    Moersch site, if I remember right.
    I've doubts a test with anything so caustic as NaOH is
    a fair test of the paper's emulsion. I test for developer
    incorporated emulsions using a bath of sodium carbonate
    which alone has a ph somewhat but not greatly above the
    usual print developers'.

    Of the four papers; Arista Classic, Emaks K-888, Kentmere
    Bromide, and Slavich Unibrom 160, none have produced even
    a trace of image. All DW FB Glossy Grade 2. Dan

  6. #16
    Andrew Moxom's Avatar
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    Well, I tried Bromportrait 80 G3 in Arista-Lith developer tonight..... Dilution was 1:14 for part A and 1:14 for part B... It did not work as anticipated. Basically, an image came up in about 6 minutes and it looked like identical to a regularly developed print. So I wonder if the embossed emulsion does have super coatings, or something added that stops it from lithing as well as it's unibrom 160 brother. I guess I need to try Unibrom now. Now I've seen an example of lith'd Unibrom in Tim Rudman's book so I hope the emulsion has not changed since this book was printed? So my quest for a Forte PWT and lith replacement is still underway. I guess I'll have to get by with some Forte Fortezo paper I have that I've not tried in lith, but heard works well.

    For those that are trying Bromportrait, it could be that Arista-Lith is the problem, but every lithable paper i've tried in it usually works okay. I even tried Foma-tone tonight as well, and was pleasantly surprised, but found it did not liberate the same subtle tonality of Forte PWT. Now it toned okay, but did not shift color much and stayed very greenish warm.

  7. #17
    Travis Nunn's Avatar
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    I've only tried the Slavich Unibrom 160 double weight in lith and I got no colors at all. I used my standard dilution of 1:19 Maco SuperLith. What I got was a very graphic type print, all blacks and whites with very little, if any mid tones (no color at all). I made several prints and gave up on it. The developer was just fine, I made a couple of lith prints on other papers that came out as expected.

    I found a quote from Tim Rudman that may explain my results here...
    http://www.freestylephoto.biz/board/...wer.php?id=128
    ____________________________________________
    Searching my way to perplexion

  8. #18
    Andrew Moxom's Avatar
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    Travis, Thanks for that update. I think I have to try Slavich Unibrom in Arista-Lith based upon Tim's comment in your link. Sounds like Arista-Lith is working well for a few people.

  9. #19

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    I threw 10 sheets of 11X14 into the shopping cart of my last Freestyle order which is not expected to arrive until next Tuesday. I will throw a few homebrew lith developers at it and see what I get.

    Thanks for reporting your findings. I wonder if it is just a very slow paper? Perhaps gross over-exposure will bring out some mid tones?

  10. #20
    semeuse's Avatar
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    I have tried both the Unibrom and the silk in lith and found that a first pass didn't do much, but a bleach and redevelop (as described by Tim Rudman) releases quite a spectacular result.

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