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  1. #21

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    Thanks for the info Semeuse, what kind of bleach did you use? Potassium Ferricyanide + Potassium Bromide?

  2. #22
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Andy, thank you for reporting your findings. However, all may not be lost. If you have the patience, try a weaker solution of the lith developer. I found, for instance, that Ilford MGWT works well in a strong solution like the Arista you use, but looks very much like a normal print. Just a slight green cast and added warmth to the highlights. In weaker solutions, about 1+30 of both solutions, it turns an interesting gritty character, albeit super slow. Figure 20 minutes in the soup or so. Mistakes are not fun to recover...
    Just something to try if you have the time.

    I'm glad you liked Fomatone. It does interesting things at different dilutions. How did it tone in selenium for you? And what version of Fomatone did you use?

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #23
    Andrew Moxom's Avatar
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    Thomas, I used Fomatone MG WT classic. Glossy paper. It's seems more of a muddy / greenish brown color than polywarmtone, which exhibits some really nice chocolatey and pink/purple tones. With Selnium, I was able to darken the foma paper slightly to a warmth I like and to remove the greenish cast which I do not like. I actaully like this Foma paper in Neutol as well. It seems to work well in that..... It may have a place in my darkroom now :-)

  4. #24
    semeuse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmichael View Post
    Thanks for the info Semeuse, what kind of bleach did you use? Potassium Ferricyanide + Potassium Bromide?
    With the ferricyanide/bromide bleach I got some nice orange-yellow/brown splits. With copper sulfate there is a dramatic yellow/green/brown - though extremely slow to work - 2-3 hours in the bleach (50g copper sulfate, 6ml sulfuric acid, 45g sodium chloride, in 1l water).

  5. #25

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    the paper has developer incorporated in it still some grade 3 is available at freestyle. to make it work just do a simple extra step pre soak the paper. it gives very brownish image quite different from uniform

  6. #26
    TheToadMen's Avatar
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    I have no experience myself yet, but I'm looking into lith printing to try it myself.
    I found this info from Tim Rudman in his Lith Printing Materials Report (updated March 2013).
    [And check out his report to see what "semi-lith" is about]


    Slavich (Russia)
    Produced by Kompania Slavich in the Yaroslavskaya region of Russia and distributed to 'theWest' through Geola Digital in Vilnius, Lithuania, who maintain English-speaking staff. Slavich papers are now available from Silverprint in London and The Photo Shop in Ireland.


    UNIBROM 160 BP
    Possibly the only remaining truly lith-capable paper in production. A cold-tone, fibre-basedsilver bromide emulsion, available in many sizes as single-weight (150 microns) mid-weightand double-weight (250 microns) base thickness and available in glossy, semi-gloss & mattsurfaces, Grades 2, 3 and 4.
    By far the most graphic and the coldest of all lithable papers with a look all of its own. Thispaper with average strength lith processing gives high contrast images almost reminiscentof charcoal drawings. It can be the trickiest paper to control as it is prone to acceleratinginfectious development around the edges and often to random spots and patches. This ismuch less in Maco Superlith* (now Rollei Vintage Creative developer*), Arista Liquid Lith*and Clayton Lith developers, which are therefore the developers of choice (*see update footnote) with Slavich Unibrom, especially in higher dilutions.
    Agitation technique can be critical for even results with this paper.
    Smoother tones may be obtained with redevelopment after bleaching ('2nd pass lith')especially with copper sulphate bleach (see my books and 'the Future of Lith?' above), whichcan be particularly useful.
    *Update October 09: NOTE: Arista liquid lith and Rollei Vintage Creative lith haveboth changed. See below under Developers.

    BROMOPORTRAIT 80 BP ("SEMI LITH")
    This is a new warm tone paper in Europe and is made in a similar range of weights andsurfaces and a wide range of sizes.
    This paper can produce luscious rich brown prints in lith developer, but can also be a sourceof unsightly side effects. It appears to have some incorporated developer in it, so whilst thispaper produces prints in rich lith print colours - and I have seen many - it is not a good paperfor real lith printing. As mentioned in the preamble, there is a world of difference in seeing aprint in the hand and trying to control one in the darkroom for a pre-visualized result, andthis paper does not, of course, offer the necessary controls, even using those techniqueslisted in 'New Rules' above. A fuller description of Bromoportrait is given under 'Comingsand Goings' in the Preamble section.

    Both papers require deep red safelights
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Nikon S2, Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T, Nikon F4s, Olympus Pen FT, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras.

  7. #27
    mr rusty's Avatar
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    I've only tried the Slavich Unibrom 160 double weight in lith and I got no colors at all. I used my standard dilution of 1:19 Maco SuperLith. What I got was a very graphic type print, all blacks and whites with very little, if any mid tones (no color at all). I made several prints and gave up on it
    Yes, compared with Foma, Unibrom is very contrasty in lith, (I use moersch easylith at about 1:30). I overexpose 2 stops on the reading my analyser gives me. I tone in selenium. I expect if I played around I could get different results, but I can fairly consistently get a repeatable result which I like. - see some of the lith images in my gallery.

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