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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post
    The first three negs had developed OK but had high base fog as I was warned about.
    pentaxuser
    For reducing fog I came across a quote on a blog (silverbased.org) referring to a table of developing agents on page 455 from CEK Mees The Theory of the Photographic Process (1942) which he says the image to fog ratio appears generally to be around twice as good at 15 C than at 25 C.
    I don't have a copy of the book but thought it may be a useful note if you have temperature /time curves for the film. Maybe someone here has the book or can enlighten further.
    Richard

  2. #22

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    ASA 125 with a serif Kodak would probably make it late 1960's to early 1970's. Sans-serif Kodak happened in the 1970's, and the jump to ASA 125 somewhere in the 1960's. I think my VP with mid-1960's expiration dates is ASA 100.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by fschifano View Post
    You wrote, "If no-one has any answers on this combo, I might be prepared to go for some Ilford ID11 on the basis that Ed Buffalo gives 7 mins for D76 at stock and that D76 and ID11 are very similar. I noticed that the agitation times however for D76 exceed those for ID11 considerably. Ed recommends constant agitation for the first 30 secs then 10 secs every 30 secs whereas ID11 is first 10 secs then 10 secs every minute."

    I haven't used Verichrome Pan for a long time, but when it was freely available I used it all the time. Back in the day, I used Microdol-X and D-76 but preferred D-76. ID-11 is functionally equivalent so that won't be a problem. Just use the manufacturer's recommended time of 7 minutes at full strength or 8 minutes diluted 1+1 at 20 deg. C.
    Yes! From my experience, Kodak D-76 will work fine with Verichrome Pan (Thus, Ilford ID-11 should also work fine - it is Ilford's version of D-76).

    In my experience, Kodak Microdol-X also works well with Verichrome Pan, so I would expect Ilford Perceptol to give the same results at the same time, temperature and agitation.
    Tom Hoskinson
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    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  4. #24

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    Me too

    Tonight I was going through some boxes in my garage and came across on old Kodak folding camera that I picked up a long time ago. I can't remember where I got it, probably at a garage sale or something. My father had one just like it, but I don't think this was my father's because, to my amazement, there was an exposed roll of Verichrome Pan in it and I'm pretty sure my father would not have let something like that slip. Also, if it was my dad's, I'm sure I would have opened it up a long time before this.

    Anyway, the film says "Verichome Pan 620" in yellow on a green stripe on each edge of the paper, which is red. "Kodak" is in yellow, serif. It also says "Pan Film" in green in two small yellow rectangles right over the "Kodak" There is no indication of film speed. For obvious reasons I can only see the last inch or so of the exposed end of the backing paper.

    I can guess that the film is at least 40 years old and that fogging will be a problem. I know for sure that this camera has spent time in both my attic and garage, through summers and winters. So it's been roasted and chilled pretty good. I have no idea how it was stored before I got it and I've got it at least 10 years.


    All I have on hand is D-76 so I'd like to use that as the developer.

    Can anyone suggest a good combination for reducing fog? Does it matter if D-76 straight or 1:1? Lower temp with longer time or vice versa?

    Any help is appreciated.

    Thanks,

    Louis
    Louis
    (Paladin1420)

  5. #25
    chriscrawfordphoto's Avatar
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    I have several rolls of Verichrome pan that expired in 1994. They've not been exposed and were kept in cool environment, but not refrigerated. Does anyone think they're worth using?
    Chris Crawford
    Fine Art Photography of Indiana and other places no one else photographs.

    http://www.chriscrawfordphoto.com

    My Tested Developing Times with the films and developers I use

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    Fort Wayne, Indiana

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by chriscrawfordphoto View Post
    I have several rolls of Verichrome pan that expired in 1994. They've not been exposed and were kept in cool environment, but not refrigerated. Does anyone think they're worth using?
    They are definitely worth to try.

  7. #27

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    I just processed some "found film" - Kodak Verichrome Pan in 127 format. I processed in D-76 and got very usable negatives with hardly any base fog but a lot of film curl.

    Here are the results.

  8. #28
    Jersey Vic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elekm View Post
    I just processed some "found film" - Kodak Verichrome Pan in 127 format. I processed in D-76 and got very usable negatives with hardly any base fog but a lot of film curl.

    Here are the results.
    These turned out GREAT! Do you know anything about these negs? Who... what.. where?

    I'm up next. I have a Kodak Six-Twenty folder w/ meniscus lens and there's a roll of Verichrome pan 620 I'm go to finish shooting and develop soon.

    Thanks for posting and all of the help and info in this thread.
    Holga: if it was any more analog, you'd need a chisel.

  9. #29

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    I would like to comment..even if you get rather high base fog from vintage film, you can usually "print it out" if you make your prints in the darkroom, rather than scan.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by paladin1420 View Post
    Tonight I was going through some boxes in my garage and came across on old Kodak folding camera that I picked up a long time ago. I can't remember where I got it, probably at a garage sale or something. My father had one just like it, but I don't think this was my father's because, to my amazement, there was an exposed roll of Verichrome Pan in it and I'm pretty sure my father would not have let something like that slip. Also, if it was my dad's, I'm sure I would have opened it up a long time before this.

    Anyway, the film says "Verichome Pan 620" in yellow on a green stripe on each edge of the paper, which is red. "Kodak" is in yellow, serif. It also says "Pan Film" in green in two small yellow rectangles right over the "Kodak" There is no indication of film speed. For obvious reasons I can only see the last inch or so of the exposed end of the backing paper.

    I can guess that the film is at least 40 years old and that fogging will be a problem. I know for sure that this camera has spent time in both my attic and garage, through summers and winters. So it's been roasted and chilled pretty good. I have no idea how it was stored before I got it and I've got it at least 10 years.


    All I have on hand is D-76 so I'd like to use that as the developer.

    Can anyone suggest a good combination for reducing fog? Does it matter if D-76 straight or 1:1? Lower temp with longer time or vice versa?

    Any help is appreciated.

    Thanks,

    Louis
    I finally had a chance to process this film and was pretty happy with the results. I used d76 1:1. I used a cooler temperature than normal (65 degrees) for about 15 minutes instead of 10 to try to supress fogging.

    I was wrong about a couple of things though. The first was that instead of being at least 40 years old, the film was only about 30 years old. I know this because of the other thing I got wrong: This was indeed my father's camera and not the one that I bought. The pictures were taken by me sometime back in the late 1970s and I'm danged if I remember taking them. But I did because pictures don't lie and these surely were mine.

    Louis
    Louis
    (Paladin1420)

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