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  1. #11
    marcsv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole View Post
    This summer in Australia it's a bit of a scorcher! Boxing Day (day after Christmas Day) was 44.3+ degrees celcius and since then it's cooled down to 40+ and now a couple of weeks later just a mere 35+ d celcius. I can't get developing as the water out of the tap is too hot hot hot. I really need to get that temp control thing happening in the water pipes. Have you done this before? Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought you can only control temperature by warming it up, not cooling down. Is it easy enough to do yourself?
    I'm from the Philippines and I use Acufine a lot, when it gets too hot here I just store a quart of it in my ref. I put my fixer in a water bath (a large pail with some ice) before starting the session. I've had little to no problems with this set up so far.

  2. #12
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    You can also do things like put ice cubes in a plastic bag to cool the developer. If the water isn't actually so hot that it damages the developer, there is a time/temperature conversion chart on most of the Ilford data sheets and in the back of Anchell's _Darkroom Cookbook_, so you can adjust development time for a different temperature than you usually use. I use this all the time with Acufine, which I keep in a deep tank and replenish, but this is a developer that will crash if it gets too hot. I discovered this once when I'd been away for a few weeks one summer and came back to process my film, and the first six sheets came out blank. I'd later discovered that the air conditioning in our building had gone out for a few days, so it had probably reached over 90 degrees F. in our apartment. Now I always test to make sure the developer is still active if I haven't used it for a while.

    Tropical developers were designed with hardeners usually to keep the emulsion from floating off the film or plates in hot climates. They still might be a good idea under those conditions with soft films like Efke, but probably aren't necessary with Kodak/Ilford/Fuji, which are harder and have protective layers.
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  3. #13
    Ross Chambers's Avatar
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    Dear Nicole,

    Do I understand from your second post that it is the final rinse stage temperature that is the problem?

    My Blue Mountains tap water temperatures are around 21 - 22 degrees currently (runs off to darkroom with thermometer in hand), and I (not being one for precision at the final wash point) just accept that.

    Somewhere there must be info re wash temperatures, but I haven't detected any problems from not striving for 20 degrees at final wash; however I'm not talking of 34 - 40 degrees. Under those circumstances the darkroom is the last place to find me!

    Regards - Ross

  4. #14
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Many years ago I needed water at 0-2°C for emulsion washing. It's easy and extremely cheap just get an old working household refrigerator and remove the compressor & cooling/freezer part and fit the freezer part into a tank then pass water through the tank cooling the water as it passes. Of course these fridges usually have a temperature control sensor so that goes in the tank too, a little experimenting will gt you close to the cool water you require.

    You could put the water into a holding/mixing tank to get the final required temperature for making up solutions and washing. This is what I'll be doing when I finally get a new darkroom in Greece/Turkey.

    Ian

  5. #15

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    Maybe we could send some cooler water from New Zealand ?

    What about using a plastic chilly-bin/esky part filled with water, and use that as a tempering bath. You could use one of the ice-block things too if necessary, or mix the tap water with some refrigerated water. This will hold the temperature pretty constant for long enough to do the developing. Then just mix some refrigerated water with tap water for your rinse.

  6. #16
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Nicole,

    What is the ambient temperature in your darkroom? Is it suitable for washing? I have gone to using a series of water baths for washing because of my darkroom layout and expensive high mineral content tap water. I keep spring water in water coolers (eskis) with taps on them used for supplying water at work sites, or in 2.5 gallon bulk chemical vats with taps. This keeps water at room temp, or warmer with aquarium heaters.

    It's a bit of managing to keep the supply topped off and tempered, but it might solve your problem in the summer. If your ambient temps are still too warm, it would be easier to adjust water temps from ambient rather than your summer tap temperature.

    Do you have the thin plastic bottles for freezing water to be used in eskies instead of loose ice? If so, you could find a suitable size and freeze that to help temper wash water just before processing.

    There is a recent thread about this wash method here on APUG: http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/4...technique.html

    One study on this washing method is here: http://www.geocities.com/researchtri...93/ilfwash.pdf

    Lee

  7. #17

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    If the concern is with washing water, I wonder how successful this would be: Fill some plastic bags with ice and drape them over the cold water pipe under the sink. That should help reduce the temperature of water coming through that pipe, although I don't know by how much -- probably it would depend on factors like the temperature of the ice and the length of pipe that can be so exposed.

  8. #18
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Many years ago I needed water at 0-2°C for emulsion washing. It's easy and extremely cheap just get an old working household refrigerator and remove the compressor & cooling/freezer part and fit the freezer part into a tank then pass water through the tank cooling the water as it passes.
    This sounds a lot like the milk chiller we used in the dairy when I was a student at Deep Springs College (which is also a working ranch-- http://www.deepsprings.edu for more info). The fresh milk was poured into a V-shaped trough and then passed over a vertical metal plate with a chilling coil running through it, and then was collected at another trough at the bottom and was funneled into a stainless steel milk storage canister and taken to the boarding house where it would be served at meals and used in the kitchen.
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  9. #19

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    My darkroom is in the basement. It is always below 20C except for about a month or two in the summer. Tap water is usually at about 9C all year around. That big ice cube called Lake Superior never warms up. After reading all the posts in this thread, it appears too hot is much more difficult to deal with than too cold. Even when the temp here hits +40C the tap water is still 9C.
    Rick Jason.
    "I'm still developing"

  10. #20

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    I have an inline temp gauge and it was showing 24C the other night... being in Melb like Kevin that figures I'm happy to wash at that temp. If it gets hotter I go to the Ilford method (I'm too lazy to do this all the time!). For mixing the developer and intermediate rinses (i.e. my stop bath) I temper a bucket of water to 20C using water out of the fridge.

    Nige.

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