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  1. #1
    Nicole's Avatar
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    Too hot to handle dev

    This summer in Australia it's a bit of a scorcher! Boxing Day (day after Christmas Day) was 44.3+ degrees celcius and since then it's cooled down to 40+ and now a couple of weeks later just a mere 35+ d celcius. I can't get developing as the water out of the tap is too hot hot hot. I really need to get that temp control thing happening in the water pipes. Have you done this before? Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought you can only control temperature by warming it up, not cooling down. Is it easy enough to do yourself?

  2. #2

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    Distilled water ice cubes.

  3. #3

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    nicole
    i have cooled water down before.
    was about 30ºC.
    and i would keep developer and fixer in the studio fridge
    so it was nice and cold ... and when i mixed with the warmer water
    it was the right temp ...
    to keep things cool, i would also fill a metal film tank with water and put it in the
    fridge or freezer and put THAT in my chemistry to cool it down.
    when it is hot, the temp creeps up, so i always adjusted my developing times a little ( i made a chart ).


    hope the heat wave get a bit cooler for you, sounds hot !

    -john

  4. #4
    Valerie's Avatar
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    I have a similar problem here during Texas summers. My solution is a water bath with ice cubes to cool things down. I keep a thermometer in the bath and add icecubes or tap water to keep temps consistent. The tub is large enough for all the chems to bathe in while waiting thier turn.
    "So I am turning over a new leaf but the page is stuck". Diane Arbus

  5. #5
    Nicole's Avatar
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    Hi Brook John & Valerie, thank you for your tips. I appreciate your input. I'm sorry I forgot to mention it's the running water I use for the rinse that's difficult to control in the heat. Oh, I have no bathtub... yet!!! I might have to get me an old tub and stick it in the old back yard. Perfect!! lol

  6. #6
    Sean's Avatar
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    I think your only option is something like an aquarium chiller, but it would probably have to be a big one to cool water that hot:

    http://www.aquariumsuppliesaustralia...duct_list&c=24

  7. #7
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    Nicole, I have the same problem here in Tucson for about 6 months of the year. I keep some water in the fridge in a plastic milk jug, that's for the developer. For film I use less running water than many people do. I keep water at between 72 and 80f for the wash portion and instead of doing a constant stream, I use a soak and dump method. The film is allowed to sit in a container and agitated from time to time. This is dumped and more cool water is added. Agitate a couple of times, dump and stand again. Don't know how archival my negatives are, but this seems to work pretty well for me. The tap water here in summer can b 92f for a few months at a time due to shallow water lines. Best, tim

  8. #8
    Kevin Caulfield's Avatar
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    Here in Melbourne, there are usually only a few days per year when it is too hot for me to process film. I find that if we have a run of 30 plus C days, the water temperature will go up to about 25 or 26, but usually it doesn't get much higher than 24 C.

  9. #9

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    As mentioned, ice cubes will work, but if you pre-freeze some water in empty 35mm film canisters, they will cool off your dev without diluting it further. When you need to, just re-freeze.

  10. #10

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    Another approach is to use a "tropical" developer. These are designed to process film at higher temperatures than "normal." I believe there are instructions in Troop's Darkroom Cookbook on how to convert a "normal" developer into a tropical one, but I don't have my copy handy to look this up.

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