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  1. #11

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    Julia, you might want to post more details about your fixer -- what brand and type is it, how did you mix it, and how long are you fixing? Proper use of fixer varies from one brand and type to another. Most notably, fixers based on ammonium thiosulfate ("rapid" fixers) typically fix paper in a minute or so, whereas fixers based on sodium thiosulfate (conventional fixers) take substantially longer. If you're using a sodium thiosulfate fixer with times appropriate for rapid fixers, this could explain your problems. Likewise if you've over-diluted the fixer because of a measurement error or mis-reading the instructions.

    Another point: Bad fixers often acquire a rotten egg odor and/or a precipitate. If you see stuff floating in the fixer bottle when you stir it or if you smell rotten eggs, you should discard the fixer.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Noel View Post
    Fix longer, and agitate while in the fixer. Or use a stronger dilution of fixer. If these are fiber based prints, they may take 5 -10 minutes to fix completely. It is necessary to agitate the prints occasionally while fixing.
    These times are appropriate for sodium thiosulfate fixers; ammonium thiosulfate fixers are typically quicker than this.

    The be sure to wash sufficiently. If you use a washing aid, 10 minutes is enough.If not, 30 minutes is usually recommended.
    This sounds like a regimen for fiber-based (FB) papers. For RC papers, washing times can be shorter -- recommendations I've seen range from 2 to 5 minutes, with no wash aid required.

  3. #13

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    I use RC paper is class, and We're fixing for at least a minute before checking in light, then 9-10 minutes after that (trying to get total of 10 minutes)

    So, I'd say try fixing for ~10 minutes and see if it still happens.

  4. #14

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    You guys are fixing for 10 minutes? That's a long time for RC paper, even with regular sodium thiosulfate fixers. That 10 minutes is usually more than sufficient for films which take longer to fix out than papers. Ammonium thiosulfate (aka rapid) fixers work much faster than sodium thiosulfate based ones and will clear the notoriously difficult to fix Kodak's Tmax films in 2 to 3 minutes, with complete fixing accomplished in 7 minutes or so. Foma films fix out very quickly, and rapid fixers will clear an undeveloped film chip in a minute or so.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by fschifano View Post
    Ammonium thiosulfate (aka rapid) fixers work much faster than sodium thiosulfate based ones and will clear the notoriously difficult to fix Kodak's Tmax films in 2 to 3 minutes, with complete fixing accomplished in 7 minutes or so. Foma films fix out very quickly, and rapid fixers will clear an undeveloped film chip in a minute or so.
    My experience is that Foma films clear in rapid fixers (Kodak Hardening Rapid Fixer, TF-3, or Suzuki's Neutral Rapid Fixer) in 30 seconds or less. Those films are very quick to clear. IIRC, the instructions for these products say to fix RC papers for ~1 minute. I don't know if RC papers vary amongst themselves in necessary fixing time. Even if they do, I certainly agree that a 10-minute fixing time is excessive, except maybe when using nearly-exhausted standard (sodium thiosulfate) fixer.

  6. #16

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    Well yes, you're right about the Foma films. I'm using Kodak's Flexicolor fixer for C-41, which is really nothing more special than your garden variety rapid fixer. A wet, but undeveloped chip of Foma film clears in no time flat. Perhaps even 30 seconds is overly conservative. I gave a figure of 1 minute to account for more highly diluted fixing baths and/or partial exhaustion. A piece of fogged, but undeveloped, paper with the purple/grey coloration the OP described, will turn white in that fixer almost upon contact. If ten minutes are needed to completely fix out a sheet of paper in ANY rapid fixer, the stuff is near useless and should be discarded.

    I'm spoiled rotten by this fixer. It is very fast, and even better, it's cheaper than anything else I can lay my hands on. The PH is about 6.5 at working strength, which makes it nearly neutral, and it washes out quickly. There is no hardener, which is unnecessary for the materials I use most frequently. Enough concentrate to make 5L of film strength working solution can be had for around 5 USD around these parts.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by fschifano View Post
    You guys are fixing for 10 minutes? That's a long time for RC paper, even with regular sodium thiosulfate fixers. That 10 minutes is usually more than sufficient for films which take longer to fix out than papers. Ammonium thiosulfate (aka rapid) fixers work much faster than sodium thiosulfate based ones and will clear the notoriously difficult to fix Kodak's Tmax films in 2 to 3 minutes, with complete fixing accomplished in 7 minutes or so. Foma films fix out very quickly, and rapid fixers will clear an undeveloped film chip in a minute or so.
    I thought we were talking paper?

    We fix our films (Arista.EDU also Foma) in fixer for 5 minutes, I always fix my film at home for 8 though.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by maddermaxx View Post
    I thought we were talking paper?

    We fix our films (Arista.EDU also Foma) in fixer for 5 minutes, I always fix my film at home for 8 though.
    Yes, we are talking paper. Most of us seem to be talking about rapid fixers, too, although of course non-rapid fixers are, well, less rapid. It's critical when discussing fixing times to reveal whether you're talking about rapid or non-rapid fixer. If you don't know, find out.

  9. #19
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    I mixed all new chemicals tonight and when I finished the prints turned purple!

    I looked up this tread and read it completely. I then went to check the full strength hypo solution to check to see if it had an expiration date and I discovered that PhotoFlo makes a crappy fixer!

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    I mixed all new chemicals tonight and when I finished the prints turned purple!

    I looked up this tread and read it completely. I then went to check the full strength hypo solution to check to see if it had an expiration date and I discovered that PhotoFlo makes a crappy fixer!

    Steve
    This, I suspect, is the most likely explanation to the OP's problem: it wasn't active fixer in the fixer tray... Any fixer at all for even a short time will give some protection - to fade within seconds suggests no fixer at all to me. I flash-fix RC test strips for 10-15 seconds (fibre 30s) before turning the light on (film strength rapid fixer) and they do not generally fade noticeably at all during the session.

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