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  1. #1

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    Pictures turn purple?

    Hello, I just begun working in the darkroom and my english is very poor, so I apologize if I am a little vague.
    I think I do everything the right way, but as soon as the pictures get into daylight, the turn greypinkpurple-ish. My developer and fixingfluid are brand new, same for the paper. I have tried 3% vinegar, 3% lemonacid and normal water as a stopbath.
    Does someone has an idea what the reason might be? I feel very stupid, I have read a lot of books about the subject but it is not mentioned anywhere, and no one in my environment nows it.

    Thanks a lot in advance, Julia

  2. #2
    Ole
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    Do the pictures turn purple immediately, or does it take some minutes?

    If they turn greypinkpurple-ish over a few minutes, then I suspect the fixer. Is it the same colour as if you take an unexposed and undeveloped paper out in daylight? Greypinkpurple-ish is a very good description of what happens to them.

    And as a last comment: Your English is fine, so do not worry. What other language(s) do you know? I am convinced that someone here understands just about any language!
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
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  3. #3

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    I had simillar problem once. In my darkroom beginnig times I once filled fixer bottle with water because I wanted to wash it later, and totally forget about it. So, when making prints I regulary developed it, stop, but fixing print with water instead of fixer. It took me 10 prints and 2 times fresh developer mixing untill released it was fixer error

    As Ole said, it is most probably fixer problem. When you said your fixer is brand new, is that means you bought new fixer, or you have old fixer bottle, but fresh working solution made? If fixer is too old, buy new one. Check if your fixer working solution is week, that is if fixer is too much diluted, or fixing time is too short. For example if fixer can be dillued 1:9 to 1:14, dilute it 1:9. And if for 1:9 dilution is needed 30 seconds fixing, leave print in fixer for 1 minute. And move print or rock the fixing tray if not continuisly, then from time to time during fixing. Next is working temperature checking, but I think temperature is not problem, for example if you work under room temperature, and if your fixing solution has room temperature, let say between 18(20 is better) and 24 degrees Celsious, you shouldn't have problems... And if you want, buy new fixer, that will make things easier than finding out what is wrong with your existing fixer And if with new fixer you still have same problems, then it is not fixer, but again, it is most probably fixer problem.

    Next, you can use water as stop bath, that is not to use your vinegar/lemon stop bath, but to use plain tap water as stop bath. That way you can eliminate stop bath mix as cause of problems during testing, even if stop bath probably is not cause of problems.

    Oh, I am sorry for asking, you wash print after fixing it as you should, that is sufficient time of washing at temperature let say close to processing temperature

    Good luck.
    Bosnia... You don't have to be crazy to live here, but it helps...
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  4. #4
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    I know that not correctly fixing paper will result in them turning greyish colour. As other have said in the this thread, you're problem it almost certainly related to your fixer. It's possible the fixer you have purchased is too old or too weak. Use a stronger dilution or purchase/mix a fresh batch.
    "The secret to life is to keep your mind full and your bowels empty. Unfortunately, the converse is true for most people."

  5. #5

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    I too, am almost certain that your problem is a fixing problem. Either the fixer is bad, weak, or you have not fixed the paper for a sufficiently long enough time. If you take a small piece of photo paper and leave it out in room light, you will notice that it turns approximately the same color as your prints have on its own.

  6. #6
    Dave Miller's Avatar
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    Welcome to the forum Julia.
    I hope the answers here are helpful. I too think your fixer is the problem.


    Quote Originally Posted by Julia20 View Post
    Hello, I just begun working in the darkroom and my english is very poor, so I apologize if I am a little vague.
    I think I do everything the right way, but as soon as the pictures get into daylight, the turn greypinkpurple-ish. My developer and fixingfluid are brand new, same for the paper. I have tried 3% vinegar, 3% lemonacid and normal water as a stopbath.
    Does someone has an idea what the reason might be? I feel very stupid, I have read a lot of books about the subject but it is not mentioned anywhere, and no one in my environment nows it.

    Thanks a lot in advance, Julia
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Miller View Post
    Welcome to the forum Julia.
    I hope the answers here are helpful. I too think your fixer is the problem.
    Hi Julia,

    Welcome to APUG. Your problem does indeed sound like a fixing issue. In addition to checking the condition of the fixer, make sure you are using adequate agitation, and enough time in the fixer. Even if the fixer is good, the film still needs enough time and shaking to get fixed and cleared.

  8. #8
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    I find my test prints are pretty well fixed after 15 seconds in the fixer at normal room temperatures (though of course, for prints you want to keep, you should follow the manufacturer's recommendations which is normally one or two minutes) so I think it most likely that the fixer was bad for some reason.

    Only other thing I can think of is if you have colour paper rather than b&w paper but I have no idea what happens if you run colour paper through b&w chemicals - I'm sure someone here will have tried it however!

    I did once over-dilute fixer (I diluted already diluted fixer, so instead of mixing 1+4 it was 1+24 - ooops) - that was with film though and I was able to re-fix it quickly when I saw it wasn't fixed properly when I opened the tank. Unfortunately, unlike film, there is no visible change with paper to warn you.

    Good luck, Bob.

    P.S. Anyone who can invent "greypinkpurple-ish" has a grasp of the English language in excess of many who have been speaking it from childhood, so no worries there .

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Julia20 View Post
    Hello, I just begun working in the darkroom and my english is very poor, so I apologize if I am a little vague.
    I think I do everything the right way, but as soon as the pictures get into daylight, the turn greypinkpurple-ish. My developer and fixingfluid are brand new, same for the paper. I have tried 3% vinegar, 3% lemonacid and normal water as a stopbath.
    Does someone has an idea what the reason might be? I feel very stupid, I have read a lot of books about the subject but it is not mentioned anywhere, and no one in my environment nows it.

    Thanks a lot in advance, Julia

    Are you talking about prints or negatives?

  10. #10
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    Fix longer, and agitate while in the fixer. Or use a stronger dilution of fixer. If these are fiber based prints, they may take 5 -10 minutes to fix completely. It is necessary to agitate the prints occasionally while fixing.

    The be sure to wash sufficiently. If you use a washing aid, 10 minutes is enough.If not, 30 minutes is usually recommended.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

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