Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,283   Posts: 1,534,968   Online: 959
      
Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 12345
Results 41 to 44 of 44
  1. #41

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Los Alamos, NM
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,046
    It depends. If I'm just starting work and I have a reasonable negative, I can usually get an acceptable - not good - print in three or less tries. Continuing with similar negatives, I can often get a decent print in one try. (I cheat and use an on easel photometer to do that.) To get a good print often takes me a quite a bit longer. But not always. It depends on the amount of manipulation required, the sort of things that need to be done, how well my eyes are calibrated at the moment, whether there really is a good print in that negative, how clumsy I am, and a whole lot of other things. With a good negative, a good print comes pretty easily.

  2. #42
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Chicago
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,627
    Images
    151
    Between 1 (if I just printed a similar neg) and 8-10 (lousy neg, I'm tired and careless, etc). Three (inc test strip) is probably typical to get a decent work print (minimal burn/dodge)for standard printing. Five is typical for lith for me because I hate using test strips for it and exposures vary more.

  3. #43

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    47
    As has been mentioned numerous times, consistency and familiarity of a few films, developers and papers is key. Keeping things simple also helps tremendously. When I was in high school some thirty five years ago and was photography editor of the high school year book and newspaper, I almost exclusively used tri-x and D76 for film and devloper and Kodabromide, grades 2 and 3 and Dektol for paper and paper developer. I exposed for a middle gray tone and developed the film exactly the same every time. Because I was using graded paper, contrast was not an issue. Most print exposures were very close to the same time from picture to picture and from roll to roll. I exposed prints for the entire roll and then developed them three or for prints at a time. The great majority of the prints would be acceptable. Some of the remaining were not worth fine tuning. Some might be corrected with one or two adjustments with exposure or changing grade of paper. And, a few that seemed outstanding or important might require a half a dozen or so prints before I was satisfied or gave up.

    In this day and age, variable contrast paper seems to be the rule and I find that I spend a lot more time juggling print exposure and contrast filtration than I ever had to with graded paper. The first print of the roll is always the most difficult, but once I get in the groove, the later prints go a lot faster.

  4. #44
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,281
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    Somewhere from 1 to 60.

    Some print right the first time, and all attempts at "improvements" turn out to be deletorious.

    With others I can see the potential, and keep improving in small increments over a period of several years until I finally get what I wanted. Since I also tend to put these away to "mature" for long periods, I inadvertently retrace my steps several times. It may be lots of wasted time, effort and paper; but every once in a while I get a good one. As an example, last year I tried some outdated paper with a rather weird tonal curve. I couldn't think of anything I could use it for, until I remembered a negative I had struggled to print a long time ago. I finally found the negative - filed under "1973" - and it was perfect, first print!
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 12345


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin