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  1. #11
    Akki14's Avatar
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    Film developers don't work so well on paper and it looks like your prints have that muddy "pulled" from the developer too soon look to them. Using paper developer like Dektol, or Ilford Multigrade or anything else that is specifically for paper developing will help greatly. Paper developer works quick. I've not really seen a huge difference between satin and pearl surfaces but it could just be me. I don't like glossy because it shows up fingerprints quickly.
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  2. #12

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    Go with a readily available paper developer such as Kodak Dektol, LPD, etc.. Also, use a glossy paper (fiber preferably) and take drydown in consideration. Wet prints look different then dry prints because when prints dry they get darker and loose some contrast. Get the wet print to where you want it and then print it again but with 10% less exposure and when the print drys it should be close to where you want it. Another option is to use a dim inspection light (mine is 40w) and drydown will become less of an issue. Hope this helps.

    Regards,
    John

  3. #13
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    May I suggest two things, get a 25 sheet envelope of Ilford Multigrade IV RC Pearl to try out and buy an envelope of Dektol Developer. I really like the results with pearl finish RC paper as I really like the results of glossy fibre paper. For your situation stick with RC paper for now.

    Dektol is a print developer, mixing up powder turns some people off but I really love how it keeps its properties in the tray all session long. Liquid developers seem to crap out on me.
    "Life moves pretty fast, if you don't stop and look around once and a while, you might just miss it."
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  4. #14
    IOS
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    [QUOTE=pentaxuser;575602]Isn't R09 a film developer also? Where did you obtain the information to use HC-110 and then RO9 for print development? Satin RC is much duller than either Pearl or Glossy and as such looks much different while still wet compared to dry. The difference is much greater than the change in Pearl or Glossy paper from wet to dry. Difficult to judge from a scan but Satin is a very flat finish which is how it looks on my monitor.

    Use a proper print developer then judge. I have a feeling that you will not like a Satin finish anyway based on what I think your expectations of how the finished print look should be.



    I bought a bunch of paper from a photography student on Craigslist, i bought apx $200 worth of paper for $50 ! i thought i got a good deal ? I already dont like the satin paper and that is 50% of the paper i bought. I have only been printing for the past 36 hours. in the past 36 hours i bought an enlarger and paper from craigslist so you can see that im a beginner but i think i will figure it out soon. I will get some Ilford paper developer tomorrow if the photo supply store is open. Thank you for your responce.

    Jim

  5. #15
    IOS
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    I think the paper is bad ! I just made another print with the pearl paper and when it dried it looked very good compared to the other ones that are on the satin paper. I know the scan of the new one with the pearl paper looks bad but that is just my cheap scanner i used. here is the pearl paper, its was done quick so i can try the pearl. It just a CTA bus in chicago, not to interesting.

    Jim
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img0066666.jpg  

  6. #16
    IOS
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Brown View Post
    As said earlier, you need a paper deveoper. RO9 isn't one either.

    In my experience, the Ilford RC satin paper looks very flat when dry compared to when wet. This effect, coupled with your very short processing times, could be the problem. I would be using longer times in all three chems.

    Another variable you are not mentioning is the filtration you are using for contrast, if any.

    I would suggest getting some Kodak Dektol or Ilford paper developer, and some glossy paper. Read the directions and follow them for all of the chemicals and the chosen paper, and see if your results don't get better.

    Good luck. We'll be here.
    Dave, I didnt use a filter and the times for the chem's i got from kodak. Developing time was from a kodak manual, also the stopbath time was from kodak. The fixer is kodafix and i used the time on the bottle for paper, 2 minutes. I will try longer times on my next print and see how it comes out.

    Thanks
    Jim

  7. #17
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    One thing I've always done to avoid problems with the change in a print after it dries is to use my wife's blow dryer to completely dry my test strips. Then you can see right away what time will give the desired look when the print is dry. Works well for both RC and FB paper. If someone else mentioned this already, sorry for the redundancy.

  8. #18
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    Hi, to add a few more factors: 1) paper that is too old or stored in hot conditions can become "fogged" - meaning it will be overall gray in tone. Check by developing a sheet straight out the box, without exposing it. If after processing it is a mottled gray, it means it is too old.
    2) A safelight that is too bright can also fog your photo, most notably making your bright tones gray.

    Jon
    Mendocino Coast Black and White Photography: www.jonshiu.com

  9. #19
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    Many papers, even when developed in paper developer rather than film developer, exhibit a "dry down" effect, losing brilliance/ A print that may took too contrasty often dries down to the proper tone. Stick to one paper for a while until you learn to judge the look of the final print from its appearance in the darkroom, when wet.

    John, Mount Vernon, Va USA

  10. #20

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    Go for the Dektol if you find it. It's less expensive and just as good, if not better than, the Ilford stuff. I've used Ilford's Bromophen, which is similar to Dektol, and didn't like it too much. I'd never even consider using a premixed liquid concentrate for this application. They offer nothing more than the convenience of not needing to mix up the dry powder with water that is free from your tap. All that stuff is terribly overpriced, IMO, and has a very short shelf life compared to dry chemicals. Remember that liquid concentrates are still mostly water. Water is heavy. The product must be shipped, and shipping costs money.

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