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  1. #11

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    Actually, my concern about the volume of diluted D-76, 1:3, is for 4x5 sheet film. It would be nice if I could develop more than 4 sheets in a quart of developer.

  2. #12

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    Tonality: the scale of white to gray to black in a photo. That's my definition. I'll look to see what St. Ansel has to say. Anyway, diluting a dev gives you more shades of gray.

  3. #13
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
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    Venchka, I'm not 100% sure what you are calling a quart, as it could be 946ml or 1,136ml depending on whether you are using US or imperial measurements. That is a reasonably large amount of developer for 4 sheets of 4x5 film.

    I develop most of my films in D76 1+1, recently I switched to a new batch of 4x5 FP4+ in a Jobo rotary processor. I always develop 4 sheets at a time and I use 300ml of solution.

    The current batch of film is perfectly processed, with full tonal range using 300ml of D76 1+1 @ 21C for 11 minutes and 45 seconds and I'm printing on a grade 3 to grade 3 1/2 filtration setting.

    Assuming you are using either a tray or deep tank to process your film, you may consider using D76 undiluted (neat) and re-use the developer with a replenishment of fresh solution after each batch of film(s) go through. This will certainly be a cheaper situation.

    Mick.

  4. #14

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    Venchka,

    You ask about volumes of developer. My method with 5x4 FP4+ is to develop 4 sheets at a time in a divided tray using ID11 at a dilution of 1+3. I use 75ml. of developer - which is enough to do the job- and 225ml of water. Total 300mls. Lovely results. 18 minutes of constant but very gentle agitation yields negatives of normal contrast that print very easily.
    18 minutes is a long time but I love the tonality of these negatives, especially when printed on Ilford Warmtone fibre. So I'm reluctant to go for a 1+1 dilution.
    Hope this helps.

    Alan Clark

  5. #15
    Dietmar Wolf's Avatar
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    I develop with 150ml ID11 in a 470ml tank. So roughly 1:2. Diluting ID11 adds grain and sharpness. Thats all.

    I like to have a bit more grain. I take pic in 35mm and 6x6. So my 35mm pics have this "grainy" look, and my 6x6 dont look too clean (like digital )

  6. #16

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    I have used D76 1:3 with 35mm and 120 HP5 quite a bit. It does give a slight increase in grain and a little better tonality than 1:1. It does require long processing times--I don't remember exactly but around 20 minutes or more at 68 degrees. I can get a negative that has just as good tonality using Rodinal at about half that time. For most uses, D76 1:1 does a great job and you can be finished in 7-8 minutes with most films.

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