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  1. #1

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    I lost the masses of the chemicals...

    Stupid mistake here:

    I put the powders in glass containers and put the packages near the garbage. They were not there when I came back, my girlfriend threw them out. And of course I can't find the paper with calculations.

    Since I'm not going to mix it all at once, I need the masses for the ratios.

    They were all gallon packages. Are these right?

    1) D-76, 415g for 3.8 liters of stock
    2) Dektol, 551 grams for 3.8 liters of stock, and make 1:2 dilution
    3) 700 grams of fixer for 3.8 liters of stock... and dilution I forgot.

    Are these right? No?

    Can somebody please check?

    Andrey
    Last edited by Andrey; 01-22-2008 at 07:26 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2
    Shawn Dougherty's Avatar
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    A bag of D-76 (415g) should be mixed to 3.8liters of stock.

  3. #3
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    Knowing which one is D-76 makes it easy to identify the other two after they are mixed. The Dektol will turn a piece of exposed film leader black. It is not a good idea to mix part of the contents of one of these containers. They each contain several powdered compounds and there is no assurance that the distribution will be uniform. Kodak certainly will not guarantee it. The mixed fixer has a long shelf life. The D-76 should last a year if you mix it all and put it in 4, 1 qt. bottles full to the brim. Same with Dektol.
    Gadget Gainer

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by gainer View Post
    Knowing which one is D-76 makes it easy to identify the other two after they are mixed. The Dektol will turn a piece of exposed film leader black. It is not a good idea to mix part of the contents of one of these containers. They each contain several powdered compounds and there is no assurance that the distribution will be uniform. Kodak certainly will not guarantee it. The mixed fixer has a long shelf life. The D-76 should last a year if you mix it all and put it in 4, 1 qt. bottles full to the brim. Same with Dektol.
    That's why I put the powders in glass bottles and left some space in there. I can just invert it a couple of times and all the components will mix.

    I don't need a gallon of fixer standing around somewhere and more importantly, I can't risk inconsistencies. I put a LOT of time and effort to expose the film properly, so I don't want to think that my 6 month old fixer might need a 5% increase in development.

    BUT, I know which powder is which!

    I need to know just the masses I had.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shawn Dougherty View Post
    A bag of D-76 (415g) should be mixed to 3.8liters of stock.
    Thanks!

    What about dektol and kodak "professional fixer"?

    Just the masses are going to be enough.

  6. #6
    gainer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrey View Post
    That's why I put the powders in glass bottles and left some space in there. I can just invert it a couple of times and all the components will mix.

    I don't need a gallon of fixer standing around somewhere and more importantly, I can't risk inconsistencies. I put a LOT of time and effort to expose the film properly, so I don't want to think that my 6 month old fixer might need a 5% increase in development.

    BUT, I know which powder is which!

    I need to know just the masses I had.
    Lots of luck! You can invert, shake or otherwise agitate some combinations of powders and they will be more likely to separate than to mix randomly. Next time try liquid concentrates. HC110 is a fairly close substitute for D-76. It stores at least 512 ounces of working solution in a 16 oz bottle which can be used 1/2 an ounce at a time. It can also be used to develop prints with the addition of a little sodium carbonate. Liquid fixer concentrate is also available.

    6 year old fixer will not need an increase of fixing time if age is its only problem.

    If I am preaching to an obsessive-compulsive person, forget I said anything.
    Gadget Gainer

  7. #7
    Shawn Dougherty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrey View Post
    Thanks!

    What about dektol and kodak "professional fixer"?

    Just the masses are going to be enough.
    Sorry, D-76 is the only product you mention that I use on occasion. You can probably find the answer on Kodak's product info web pages. Best. Shawn

  8. #8

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    Thanks for the advice.

    The reason why I don't want to dilute a gallon of fixer, is that I don't want to have a gallon of liquid to keep for the next 2 years. Powder is more compact.

  9. #9
    gainer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrey View Post
    Thanks for the advice.

    The reason why I don't want to dilute a gallon of fixer, is that I don't want to have a gallon of liquid to keep for the next 2 years. Powder is more compact.
    Yes, but you can get the fixer concentrate a quart at a time and you don't have to dilute it all at once. The concentrate can be used an ounce or so at a time to make an amount of working solution. I don't know what the ratio is for other fixers, but the recommended ratio for TF4 liquid fixer concentrate is 1 part of concentrate to 3 parts of water. 8 ounces of concentrate makes a quart of working strength solution. How is that any worse than weighing out a certain amount of powder to make a quart of fixer? Fixer concentrate does not spoil with standing. It's easier to measure volume of liquid than weight of powder, and much more consistent when the powder is a mixture of several chemicals.
    Gadget Gainer



 

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