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Thread: I.R in 4x5

  1. #1

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    I.R in 4x5

    Been thinking about trying some IR for a few years now and just never got around to it. I've admired those images that it works for - and detested those where the IR effect is just plain gimmicky.

    I use a Zone VI field camera and was thinking of getting me a box of EFKE and a Lee 87C filter. Anyone have any advice or know of any pitfalls I should be aware of before I embark on the quest?

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    accozzaglia's Avatar
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    Hi. There appears to be an eBay auction for 2 cared-for boxes of Kodak HIE IR 4x5 on the block slated to end later today. It doesn't answer your question, but if you're shooting 4x5, the price still seems fairly affordable for what it is. Given that I've only shot IR in 35mm so far (and soon, I'll try out the Efke 820 in 120), the only advice I can give is IR-proof as best as possible wherever you handle your film. Fogging sucks.

    Also, in the 35mm/roll film sense, it is recommended to bracket every shot. Doing this with sheets seems to be a bit costly, even painful (to the wallet). I'm not sure what advice to offer.

    I'd say, "Life is short. Give it a shot."

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    Thanks for the response. Yes, I saw the e-bay offer. Problem with IR is if it's not carefully stored it's ruined - and you've got to try a few sheets just to find out. NO returning that!!

    Hear you - Life is Short! Got nothing to lose but my self respect and at my age that's LONG GONE!!!

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    JBrunner's Avatar
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    Hi guys,

    With 4x5, if you have the exposure pretty down, it is easier to change development. Not quit the same as bracketing, of course, but there is still a pretty good ability to add or reduce density and contrast. What I do is shoot both sides of a holder on the same shot, so each holder has two versions of the same shot. When I process, I run one side of each holder. After evaluation, I can then change the development for the other sheet if need be. The ability to process sheets individually this way has eliminated almost any need for bracketing the way I do with roll film. (unless I'm shooting transparencies)

    I'll be giving the Efke IR film a whirl pretty soon, so please tell how you like it.

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    Thanks - will do. BTW are the regular 4x5 holders OK for IR? I know in 35 many of the plastic-bodied cameras just fog the film.

    Bob

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    JBrunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobNewYork View Post
    Thanks - will do. BTW are the regular 4x5 holders OK for IR? I know in 35 many of the plastic-bodied cameras just fog the film.

    Bob
    Not all holders, and not all bellows are IR proof.

    Here's a thread:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum42/2...m-holders.html

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    Thanks a lot.

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    keithwms's Avatar
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    I use the Rollei IR in 4x5 with a #87- very satisfied. Just bear in mind that you're looking at longish exposures, a couple seconds on a typical LF lens at f/8 in decent light. So I started using apo process lenses because (a) there's negligible refocus; and (b) who needs a shutter when the capture is a couple seconds; and, (c) because of (a) you can shoot wide open with impunity.

    With a good apo lens you can start to play with tilts and swings in the same way you might in the visible. More creative flexibility.
    Last edited by keithwms; 01-27-2008 at 09:30 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobNewYork View Post
    Thanks - will do. BTW are the regular 4x5 holders OK for IR? I know in 35 many of the plastic-bodied cameras just fog the film.

    They don't fog the film because they're plastic bodies. They fog the film because they have infrared-based film transport systems.

    Plastic-bodied cameras like the Nikon F601/N6006 work just fine because they use a mechanical film transport system.
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

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    Quote Originally Posted by PhotoJim View Post
    They don't fog the film because they're plastic bodies. They fog the film because they have infrared-based film transport systems.

    Plastic-bodied cameras like the Nikon F601/N6006 work just fine because they use a mechanical film transport system.

    those evil windows that show what type of film you're using don't help either

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