Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,287   Posts: 1,535,333   Online: 853
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 30
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    3

    B/W negative reversal for Ilford films

    I'm trying to find out if Photographer Formulary's Reversal process for TMAX will work for Ilford FP4 125 or Delta 400, and if not, are there any other reversal processes out there?

  2. #2
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,243
    Images
    148
    Ilford have a PDF file on reversal processing. Here.

    It's very easy. The Formulary kit should work with any B&W film.

    Ian

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Seattle
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,212
    Images
    47
    This looks like it could be really fun. I hope this doesn't make me out to look like a dork, but could you use the acid from your car battery, assuming specific gravity at full charge of 12.0?

  4. #4
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,243
    Images
    148
    Quote Originally Posted by vet173 View Post
    could you use the acid from your car battery, assuming specific gravity at full charge of 12.0?
    Probably not, as it may contain a little lead or other impurities.

    Ian

  5. #5
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    22,972
    Images
    65
    If you need sulfuric acid, use battery acid from the auto store. In the US it is 35% - 37%. Or, you can get the 48% acid from the Formulary.

    PE

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    284
    I am also starting to explore B&W slides for my stereo Sputnik camera.

    A few questions come to mind from the research I've done so far:

    1) Are there any fogging redeveloper formulas which can deliver neutral toned slides? All of the formulas I've reviewed end up chocolate or sepia if you use chemicals instead of light for the 2nd development
    2) I'm leaning towards a permanganate / bisulfate bleach vs. dichromate. I hear this really softens the emulsion but that colder temperatures can help. Can I slowly cool the film after being washed from the 1st developer before I put it in the bleach? The bleach would be cooled as well. I'm thinking about 55-60F. I would increase the bleach time by about 2x.
    3) I'm planning to use HC-110 according to Jordan Wosnick's formula because I like HC-110 and have it handy. Is there a big reason not to do this?
    4) I'm planning to use Efke 100 and HP5+ for my films. Again, thoughts?

    Thanks! I've learned so much from this group. What an incredible asset to photographer's everywhere.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    3

    Copying negatives

    My reason for wanting to do black and white development is that I have some rare 4x5 photo negatives that I want to copy for my own keeping. Does anyone have any suggestions as to what film would be best or if it's even worth trying this. How much resolution of the original negative would I be capturing assuming that the camera was focused perfectly and there is no movement?

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    587
    Quote Originally Posted by amuderick View Post
    1) Are there any fogging redeveloper formulas which can deliver neutral toned slides? All of the formulas I've reviewed end up chocolate or sepia if you use chemicals instead of light for the 2nd development
    There is at least one. I think it uses sodium dithionite, but I'm not sure. Haist writes about it in his book.

    2) I'm leaning towards a permanganate / bisulfate bleach vs. dichromate. I hear this really softens the emulsion but that colder temperatures can help. Can I slowly cool the film after being washed from the 1st developer before I put it in the bleach? The bleach would be cooled as well. I'm thinking about 55-60F. I would increase the bleach time by about 2x.
    Alessandro Serrao, who also posts here, uses a process that runs at a consistent 20C (or maybe lower) to avoid stressing the gelatin as much as possible. He is able to get good results. I didn't pursue the permanganate bleach much as I found the dichromate easier to use, despite the toxicity (it is reusable, unlike permanganate bleach).

    3) I'm planning to use HC-110 according to Jordan Wosnick's formula because I like HC-110 and have it handy. Is there a big reason not to do this?
    The HC-110 trick works well, but do a test roll first to see how it goes in your set-up. And let me know how it turns out!

    I have to confess that it's been a while -- about a year -- since I've done any reversal processing. The last procedure I tried (which worked quite well) involved a strong solvent-free Rodinal first developer, followed by a separate reduction step with a thiosulfate bath. I describe it (with a link to the original) in a post here: http://www.photosensitive.ca/wp/archives/68

    Hope this helps
    Jordan

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Rome, Italy
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    884
    Quote Originally Posted by amuderick View Post
    2) I'm leaning towards a permanganate / bisulfate bleach vs. dichromate. I hear this really softens the emulsion but that colder temperatures can help. Can I slowly cool the film after being washed from the 1st developer before I put it in the bleach? The bleach would be cooled as well. I'm thinking about 55-60F. I would increase the bleach time by about 2x.
    Imho, you made the right choice.
    The only caveat is to use half the permanganate strenght of what's suggested. For example I've found using 250mg permanganate per 36exp roll quite sufficient without stressing the emulsion.

    Right: the temperature should be mantained at 20°C or lower (max 18°C) and constant (within 0.5°C) during all steps.

    But the most important thing is to use HALF permanganate strenght and not doubling the time.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA 90061
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    170
    Reversal processing usually works best with 100-125 ASA films, random grain silver is much better than "designer grain", and sulfuric acid bichromate bleach results in better quality imaging. We do manufacture reversal chemistry.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin