Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,533   Posts: 1,572,705   Online: 804
      
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 36
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    284
    Sometimes the film lasts, sometimes it doesn't.

    I have a box of 64T that failed to spread 1 month after the expire date. I also shot a roll of Type 47 which expired before I was born and it worked fine.

    B&W films do not suffer color shifts so are more resilient.

    Laying flat and cool storage will help. Sealing in a heavy-mil-thickness vacuum bag (like those kitchen vacuum sealers) seems to help.

    Again, some batches will last for years. Others, not so much. Hit or miss.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    1,344
    I once saw a series of photographs made by a woman who froze a couple of boxes of Type 59. She didn't know you weren't supposed to do that. She had ended up with a couple of extra boxes after a workshop and didn't want it to go bad.

    She ended up with images in which the emulsion separated in layers and peeled off unevenly in long, narrow strips. The pictures were simple floral still life shots that were just amazing. Some parts were normal, some parts magenta or cyan, depending on how the layers separated. It was a lucky accident for certain. So, you never know. Too expensive to for me to try intentionally, and with my luck, it probably wouldn't work.

    Peter Gomena

  3. #23
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas, USA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    2,895
    Images
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Fitzgerald View Post
    Ron, I must ask an obvious question regarding the Type 55. Would it be better to just develop the film in a regular developer? Am I missing something here. I have some old 55 in the fridge and i don't want to mess it up. Do you just separate everything in the dark and is it messy? Thanks,

    Jim
    Jim, there's been several threads here and on the LF Forum regarding this. I don't remember any of the details but it is a well known technique.
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
    My Photography Blog

  4. #24
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Ventura, Ca
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    1,795
    Images
    107
    Alex, thanks I'll do a search.

    Jim

  5. #25
    winger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Page County, IA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,477
    Images
    47
    What happens or doesn't happen when you use the Fuji for image transfers or emulsion lifts?
    The unsuitability of Fuji , for these processes, has been mentioned in other forums but without description.
    Basically, the Fuji just doesn't transfer an image to your receiving surface. It will do an emulsion lift, but doesn't stick to your receiving surface either (decoupage glue works, though).

  6. #26
    gr82bart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Culver City, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,224
    Images
    37
    Quote Originally Posted by winger View Post
    decoupage glue works
    So does a drop of SuperGlue ... hey, it's all I had at the time!

    Regards, Art.
    Visit my website at www.ArtLiem.com
    or my online portfolios at APUG and ModelMayhem

  7. #27
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,391
    Images
    65
    Jim;

    If you develop Polaroid film conventionally, what advantage do you have over buying conventional film? Not instant and much more expensive to do.

    PE

  8. #28
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,438
    Images
    20
    I haven't done it myself, but I think the attraction of developing Type 55 conventionally is that some people like the look of the film, which is usually said to be Panatomic-X. Since Pan-X and Pan-F aren't available in 4x5" these days, and Efke PL25 has a very different look (being closer to ortho senisitization), Type 55 neg offers a unique look. It's also has the attraction of being a packet film, and there aren't many B&W choices in Quickloads or Readyloads.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  9. #29
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,391
    Images
    65
    David;

    Thanks, I followed the argument except for the expense. That is really a big putoff for me, at least.

    PE

  10. #30
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,438
    Images
    20
    I would think of it more as a way of salvaging some outdated Type 55.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin