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  1. #11

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    One way to get a quick measure of possible dry down effect is to squeegee the water off the surface of the print. When the print is wet it reflects light differently than when the surface is dry and this can really help me if I need a quick look at possible dry down. I find hair drying slow and a waste of power, but when in doubt fully drying the print is the best way to go. I find the microwave can really effect the paper gloss, making the paper very glossy and thus throws off the dry down for me (on glossy all I use for fb). Hair drying seems to do the same thing to a lesser degree.

    Sometimes you can also look at a print at a stronger angle and it will also help show how the print may look when dry. I don’t know why but some technical person on here can probably explain it.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sanjay Sen View Post
    But Juan, wouldn't it save time in the long run if you know the dry-down factor and avoid the wash-squegee-dry sequence? I understand you'd need to do the tests again with a different paper.
    I don't think so. And I don't do a wash-squegee-dry sequence. In my darkroom, I have a large tray of water. I take the print from the fixer, dunk it in the water and swish it around for a few seconds. I have a few paper towels in the microwave, and pop the wet print on top for 50-seconds (8x10). I then stand the print up under my viewing light and I can compare the dry prints to one another as I make changes.

    I find this a much more reliable method to arrive at a final print than trying to evaluate a wet print and make a percentage change. It could be just me, though.
    juan

  3. #13
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    how long does it take to dry a print in the micro wave before it burts into flames?

  4. #14

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    I just guess the effect now that I'm familiar with my main papers. I can get what I'm after without any trouble. I use a compressed air hose to dry a section of the test print to get an idea of the final density if it's really critical that I get it spot on.
    The universe is a haunted house. -Coil
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  5. #15
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    Juan, I think I see what you are saying: what I currently do is a little different - from the fixer the paper goes to a print washer for five minutes, then I squegee it, and then dry it with a hair dryer. So, that's a total of at least 10-12 minutes. Your process probably takes a couple of minutes, so much faster than what I do now.

    Thanks for the inputs, guys.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by juan View Post
    I don't think so. And I don't do a wash-squegee-dry sequence. In my darkroom, I have a large tray of water. I take the print from the fixer, dunk it in the water and swish it around for a few seconds. I have a few paper towels in the microwave, and pop the wet print on top for 50-seconds (8x10). I then stand the print up under my viewing light and I can compare the dry prints to one another as I make changes.

    I find this a much more reliable method to arrive at a final print than trying to evaluate a wet print and make a percentage change. It could be just me, though.
    juan
    Can RC paper be dried in the microwave, or will the resin "fry"?
    Charles Hohenstein

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chazzy View Post
    Can RC paper be dried in the microwave, or will the resin "fry"?

    Use a hair dryer for RC. A microwave will cause it to blister and bubble.

    I have a microwave in my darkroom but I use it mostly to warm solutions. I have calibrated my print timer (RH Designs StopClock) for the papers I use. It has a dry-down compensation function built in that works great. I make my test strips with the compensation turned off. When I get a test that looks right wet, I turn on the compensation and the printing time will automatically be reduced by the percentage that I calculated during my calibration process.

    Dan
    Daniel Williams
    Enumclaw WA USA

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarkroomDan View Post
    I have calibrated my print timer (RH Designs StopClock) for the papers I use. It has a dry-down compensation function built in that works great. I make my test strips with the compensation turned off. When I get a test that looks right wet, I turn on the compensation and the printing time will automatically be reduced by the percentage that I calculated during my calibration process.

    Dan
    Now that sounds perfect.
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  9. #19

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    I'm with Juan, except that I do squeegee and then it's only 30 secs in my microwave.

  10. #20

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    Go to www.circleofthesunproductions.com Bruce Barlow has the articles he wrote for View Camera a couple years ago. He explains how to do a dry down test and lists the dry down factors for numerous papers (alas many are no longer available). While you are there, check out his book on CD "Finely Focused" well worth the $$.

    Personally, I use an old Zone VI drydown timer. Once the test is done and the dry down factor for the paper is known the rest is a breeze.

    Good Luck
    John Bowen

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