Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,911   Posts: 1,584,689   Online: 718
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22
  1. #1
    Sanjay Sen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    New York, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,251
    Images
    4

    Accounting for Dry-down

    I would be interested in hearing about how YOU account for dry-down when printing on FB papers. I've read of a number of ways of doing this - quick drying with a hair dryer or in the microwave, using a low-wattage bulb to view the test print, or doing a proper test to determine the dry-down factor.

    I employ the hair dryer route, and find that the current paper I am using requires very little to no dry-down. Someday when I can spend enough time in the darkroom, I would like to do a proper test as Les describes on his website.

    What do you do? Also, are there other ways to account for dry-down besides the ones mentioned above? Just curious...


    TIA.


    Best wishes,
    Sanjay

  2. #2
    David Brown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    near Dallas, TX USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,344
    Images
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by Sanjay Sen View Post
    Someday when I can spend enough time in the darkroom, I would like to do a proper test as Les describes on his website.

    What do you do?
    I did the test and now it's just part of the process. Invest the time. It's a lot shorter in the long run than doing test prints and using a hair dryer every time.

  3. #3
    CPorter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    West KY
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,662
    Images
    24
    I did a test with Ilford MGIV fiber using the info I read on Les's site and found that the dry down is about 8-10%----It only takes a little time to do the test as outlined by Les.

  4. #4
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,765
    Images
    40
    I just got to know the paper I was using and could tell from the wet print what the dry print would look like...I assumed about a 10% dry down on the Portriga Rapid and Ilford Gallerie I was using at the time. Now I am dealing with platinum printing and carbon printing that have a greater dry-down than silver gelatin and I do the same.

    It is not that I am anti-testing, I just rarely do it...other than expose and develop negatives and make prints -- and pay attention to the results.

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  5. #5
    Sanjay Sen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    New York, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,251
    Images
    4
    I am beginning to think it would be a good idea to devote some time and do the tests. Thanks guys!

  6. #6
    juan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    St. Simons Island, Georgia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,646
    Images
    4
    I found the tests a waste of time. As part of my printing process, I dry the work prints in the microwave and then evaluate them for needed changes. I'm comparing dry print to dry print, which works better for me.
    juan

  7. #7
    thefizz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Trim, Ireland.
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,057
    Images
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck1 View Post
    I did a test with Ilford MGIV fiber using the info I read on Les's site and found that the dry down is about 8-10%----It only takes a little time to do the test as outlined by Les.
    Ditto. I think in the long run its the easiest and best way.
    www.thephotoshop.ie
    www.monochromemeath.com

    "you get your mouth off of my finger" Les McLean

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Dedham, Ma, USA
    Shooter
    Med. Format Pan
    Posts
    625
    Quote Originally Posted by juan View Post
    I found the tests a waste of time. As part of my printing process, I dry the work prints in the microwave and then evaluate them for needed changes. I'm comparing dry print to dry print, which works better for me.
    juan
    I do it this way also, and I view the wet print under a light with moderately low wattage (40w) in the darkroom.

    Paul
    "Pictures are not incidental frills to a text; they are essences of our distinctive way of knowing." Stephen J. Gould

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    58
    I heard about the microwave technique from AA's book and that's what I did last time, worked well.

  10. #10
    Sanjay Sen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    New York, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,251
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by juan View Post
    I found the tests a waste of time. As part of my printing process, I dry the work prints in the microwave and then evaluate them for needed changes. I'm comparing dry print to dry print, which works better for me.
    juan
    But Juan, wouldn't it save time in the long run if you know the dry-down factor and avoid the wash-squegee-dry sequence? I understand you'd need to do the tests again with a different paper.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin