Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,990   Posts: 1,524,131   Online: 1164
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    124

    bergger,efke,rollei retrò advice me!

    hello people i m posting one shot that my friend have made a lot of years ago shot with rolleiflex and GEVAPAN 100 iso film...
    how i can achieve nowadays the same look????
    i think that gevapan is agfa apx and agfa apx is now rollei ???!!....

    how do you think to the new bergger film compared to efke and rollei retrò?
    many thanks
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 453705036_78f0ff7bdb.jpg  

  2. #2
    Brad Bireley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    571
    Images
    176
    I want to know also!

  3. #3
    cmo
    cmo is offline
    cmo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    1,457
    Images
    57
    The Gevapan was made from 1952, had 160 ASA. At that time there were no modern films like APX, FP4 or even Tmax.

    Probably you will get a very similar look with Efke/Adox 100 film. It is a traditional "thick emulsion" film, made on old machines using old recipes.

    http://www.adox.de/english/ADOX_Film...CHS_Films.html

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,101
    Images
    9
    Efke films have thick emulsion? I thought that thick emulsion films definitely were a thing of the past and not something that still can be bought new.

    Anyway, do you mean that certain processes like water-bath development still works well with efke films in the way Ansel Adams described in the Negative?

    Cheers

    C

  5. #5
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Montréal (QC)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,351
    Images
    132
    Quote Originally Posted by cmo View Post
    Probably you will get a very similar look with Efke/Adox 100 film. It is a traditional "thick emulsion" film, made on old machines using old recipes.

    Thick emulsion films were products of pre-WWII technology. Au contraire, Adox/Efke films were the first thin emulsion films. What we consider retro nowadays was in fact bleeding-edge in the 1950's.

    At any rate, regarding the OP's question, I would suggest: get a Rolleiflex or a Hasselblad for the Zeiss lenses, and a traditional grain film with an upswept curve like Plus-X or Tri-X 320TXP. A developer like Rodinal or HC-110 would work well.

    What's noticeable here is not grain/sharpness/blah whatever, but tones. Notice that the light is soft and diffused, coming from a window. The hair has some kind of brylcreem, and the skin is slightly oily. That's your highlights, and you want to keep them brilliant. Certain film/dev combinations enhance the highlights (like those I quoted above), others enhance the midtones (e.g. tri-x in xtol). So you want something that gives good highlight contrast.

    Films with good highlight contrast also have less details in the shadows, which gives you nice dark shadows like that picture. In lighting your scene, you thus want to make sure that the light ratio between the illuminated side and the shadow side is not too broad, otherwise you will have a completely black background. Experimentation is key.
    Last edited by Michel Hardy-Vallée; 02-18-2008 at 01:13 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

    My APUG Portfolio

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    124
    i have a rolleiflex with 75 planar 6 elements.....could i start with efke?

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    124
    the efke is the best "old times" emulsion??

    bergger or rollei retro?

    thanks

  8. #8
    Aurelien's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Limoges, France
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    669
    Images
    96
    If I were you, I would try the Bergger BRF 200. It's a "copy" or a remake of the Kodak Double-X. I love this film. I use it a lot.
    You can also try Foma Films. They are pretty good. But Efke is bas quality, because emulsion is very fragile.
    Aurelien, Analog Photographer

    the analog place to be

  9. #9
    cmo
    cmo is offline
    cmo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    1,457
    Images
    57
    Quote Originally Posted by Uhner View Post
    Efke films have thick emulsion? I thought that thick emulsion films definitely were a thing of the past and not something that still can be bought new.

    Anyway, do you mean that certain processes like water-bath development still works well with efke films in the way Ansel Adams described in the Negative?

    Cheers

    C
    As far as I understand what efke/Adox is doing they have probably the most old-fashioned machinery and recipes.

    Water-bath development? I have no idea, what's that? Presoak? My only experiments so far, not finished yet, is with Adox 25 in a Pyro developer. Very promising, looks kind of old-fashioned. But I think you will need to try on your own.

  10. #10
    cmo
    cmo is offline
    cmo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    1,457
    Images
    57
    Quote Originally Posted by mhv View Post
    Thick emulsion films were products of pre-WWII technology. Au contraire, Adox/Efke films were the first thin emulsion films. What we consider retro nowadays was in fact bleeding-edge in the 1950's.

    At any rate, regarding the OP's question, I would suggest: get a Rolleiflex or a Hasselblad for the Zeiss lenses, and a traditional grain film with an upswept curve like Plus-X or Tri-X 320TXP. A developer like Rodinal or HC-110 would work well.

    What's noticeable here is not grain/sharpness/blah whatever, but tones. Notice that the light is soft and diffused, coming from a window. The hair has some kind of brylcreem, and the skin is slightly oily. That's your highlights, and you want to keep them brilliant. Certain film/dev combinations enhance the highlights (like those I quoted above), others enhance the midtones (e.g. tri-x in xtol). So you want something that gives good highlight contrast.

    Films with good highlight contrast also have less details in the shadows, which gives you nice dark shadows like that picture. In lighting your scene, you thus want to make sure that the light ratio between the illuminated side and the shadow side is not too broad, otherwise you will have a completely black background. Experimentation is key.
    Interesting... does the "thick vs. thin" subject from today's point of view mean the T-grain films are super-thin? As far as I know one target of emulsion research was to save on silver, for obvious cost reasons.

    Regarding the highlights, in the scan the highlights are quite burnt. This can also be an effect of the scanning process.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin