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Thread: 2-bath question

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Verizzo View Post
    What did you determine was the best ISO for Tri-X?
    I'm shooting Tri-X at boxspeed, but in practice I tend to expose it more like a 320 or 200 asa film in practice. So, I'm usually shooting it at f16/250th, instead of f16/500th in broad sunlight. Not, that there is any sunlight in London at the moment...

    Great observation about loss of image with excessive agitation. I advocate just a hard rap or two on the countertop and then let it sit, unagitated for two baths. Anything else partially or completely negates what a two bath is for.
    Yes, yes. I agree. I gave it a super gentle twist halfway through bath B, to fend off bromide drag, but I agree that in this case less really is more.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by el wacho View Post
    great stuff Harry. glad to hear its going well.

    which A bath are you talking about?
    Thornton's 2-bath

  3. #23

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    Must agitate, must agitate, must

    Yes, yes. I agree. I gave it a super gentle twist halfway through bath B, to fend off bromide drag, but I agree that in this case less really is more.[/QUOTE]

    Ha ha, yes, it's hard not to do what we've done for years, isn't it? I agree that your reasoning was a good cautionary one. Try a roll w/o agitation and see if you get drag.

  4. #24
    Harry Lime's Avatar
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    >Try a roll w/o agitation and see if you get drag.

    will do.

    I would also like try try different versions of bath B to control contrast.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Lime View Post
    I would also like try try different versions of
    bath B to control contrast.
    About a teaspoon of bicarbonate of soda.
    A bath then B bath then A bath and back
    to B. Or visa versa. Use A very dilute
    as a one-shot. Dan

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Lime View Post
    >Try a roll w/o agitation and see if you get drag.

    will do.

    I would also like try try different versions of bath B to control contrast.

    Harry,

    Do you have copies of Anchell/Troop's "Darkroom Cookbook" and "Film Dev Cookbook"? There is quite a bit in these two about 2-bath devs. "Film Dev Cookbook" has many versions of DD-23 with various amounts of metol in "A" and everything from borax to sod. carb in "B"; Steckler to Adams!

  7. #27
    Harry Lime's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim appleyard View Post
    Harry,

    Do you have copies of Anchell/Troop's "Darkroom Cookbook" and "Film Dev Cookbook"? There is quite a bit in these two about 2-bath devs. "Film Dev Cookbook" has many versions of DD-23 with various amounts of metol in "A" and everything from borax to sod. carb in "B"; Steckler to Adams!
    Nope, not yet. I plan on picking up a copy.


    cheers

  8. #28

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    ??????????

    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    About a teaspoon of bicarbonate of soda.
    A bath then B bath then A bath and back
    to B. Or visa versa. Use A very dilute
    as a one-shot. Dan
    A teaspoon of bicarb for Bath B? Bicarb???? Do you mean sodium carbonate? It's cheap stuff and the pH follows concentration pretty well until about 5 grm/liter, pH 10.5.

    Why would you go back and forth between the baths without a good water rinse? Not saying that repeat bathing may not be interesting, but if you drain Bath B out and then fill with A, that A is contaminated. The pH will start rising and then development will be taking place in Bath A from then on.

  9. #29

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    [QUOTES=Paul Verizzo;594533]
    "A teaspoon of bicarb for Bath B? Bicarb????
    Do you mean sodium carbonate? It's cheap stuff
    and the pH follows concentration pretty well until
    about 5 grm/liter, pH 10.5."

    Carbonate makes for a very active developer.
    It builds contrast fast. Bicarbonate is the one
    to use. Harry wishes "to control contrast". A&H
    backing soda will do well. The lower ph is
    high enough to keep metol active while
    delivering finer grain.

    "Why would you go back and forth between the baths
    without a good water rinse? Not saying that repeat
    bathing may not be interesting, but if you drain Bath
    B out and then fill with A, that A is contaminated.
    The pH will start rising and then development will
    be taking place in Bath A from then on."

    One-shot chemistry. Any sulfited or higher ph
    developer will not have to any practical extent
    a lowering of ph.

    Any off the shelf or Home Brew developer will do
    as long as it is used very dilute. Solution volume
    must be great enough to hold the necessary
    chemistry at the high dilution; ie Rodinal
    at 1:200 or D-76 at 1:7, 500ml.

    Two tanks a reel lift and total darkness. Dan

  10. #30

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    Developed to the same CI, the activator makes no difference in grain. D-76 and other fine grain developers work because the low alkalinity allows a lot of time for the sulfite to dissolve (i.e., mush) the silver grains. Modern films are a LOT less grainy than their 1930's cousins. The grain that exists is natural and we can now aim for acutance.

    Extended time in developers allows this to happen, no matter the activator. Right off the top of my head, Patrick Gainer's PC developers, Diafine, and Otha Spencer's all use carbonate activators. All with little grain, enought to make "grainless" 11x14's. Now, if you want a bill board from you 35mm neg, that's another story!

    All of the other suggestions sound awfully complex and unneccessary, IMO. One purpose of divided development is simplicity.

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