Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,959   Posts: 1,523,049   Online: 1173
      
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 35
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Live Free or Die
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,351
    Images
    87
    I squeegee both sides of fiber and RC, and dry both face up, due to the marks from the screen mentioned by fschifano.
    I've never stripped the emulsion off a print with a squeege. Minimizing wet time may help in that regard.
    I found that without doing teh squeegee, I'd get puddles on the print, and sometimes water marks because of the excess water.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Grand Junction, Colorado
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    600
    Images
    57
    Quick question please, I picked up a hot bed dryer (think that's what it is called) in a lot of darkroom stuff for sale. Is it safe to use it for fibre prints that are intended to be labeled as "archival" The cloth has been washed and the base is just smooth plastic with tiny heating elements below it.
    Thanks,
    erik

  3. #13
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Brooklyn, N.Y. USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,418
    Images
    44
    I work only with FB paper and squeegee everything. My reasoning is like SuzanneR mentions earlier. The amount of water retained in the paper without squeegeeging are like puddles and will dry at different rates causing wavy curls. This is not the case with RC paper. Your RC paper will not absorb water (or developer/stop/fix for that matter). If you are in an environment of "higher" humidity the drying process will take longer but eventually without curl. A lot of people rely on a heated dryer such as a flatbed design or rotary. This ensures an even dry and a flat print immediately. For those who do not squeegee and use a heated dryer, they will be using a very hot machine or unnecessarily long times to achieve what a carefully squeegeed print would give them.

  4. #14
    Pragmatist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Bath, NY
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    598
    Using a wipe or squeegee is much less harmful on FB. This can however cause streaking and gouges on RC papers. Get yourself a good print dryer--shake well and blot of prints--and good results are ahead. There are too many complex solutions here--blot and dry.

    KISS--a bit of advice that seems lacking here...
    Cheers,

    Patrick

    When you come to a fork in the road, take it...

  5. #15
    Bob F.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    London
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,984
    Images
    19
    Another squeegeer (squeegeeist? squeegeeator? squeegeephile? ... ) here. My take being as already stated by others: gets excess water off to assist even drying and no puddles. Laid on a sheet of plastic - one swish along the back - one swish along the front - lay face down on screens.

    Cheers, Bob.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Live Free or Die
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,351
    Images
    87
    re: the printer, yes, if the apron is clean, there is no reason that it should be considered not archival. But it's important to make sure prints are washed properly before going on the drier, otherwise you will contaminate the apron.

    FWIW, I have 30 year old prints that were dried on a large commercial drum drier, and so far, they are fine. Though the apron got washed occasionally, getting it off and on was a huge PITA, and didn't happen very often. In archival terms, 30 years isn't such a long time, but that's the length of my "test" so far.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Willamette Valley, Oregon
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,684
    Quote Originally Posted by Contrastique View Post
    I use this (see image below) to make the
    print dry faster ...
    So what is it?

    Sponge dry. Via capillary action a sponge pulled
    slowly across both front and back will draw water
    from the print. No water to mop up. Any clean,
    kept for the purpose sponge will do.

    Photo grade sponges are available. Mine are
    kept for prints that really count. Dan

  8. #18
    Monophoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Saratoga Springs, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,691
    Images
    44
    Quote Originally Posted by Erik L View Post
    Quick question please, I picked up a hot bed dryer (think that's what it is called) in a lot of darkroom stuff for sale. Is it safe to use it for fibre prints that are intended to be labeled as "archival" The cloth has been washed and the base is just smooth plastic with tiny heating elements below it.
    Thanks,
    erik
    Quick answer - nope.

    Too much risk of contamination.
    Louie

  9. #19
    Contrastique's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    176
    Images
    68
    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    So what is it?
    Don't know the english term for such thing...It's something you normally use to clean your work top in the kitchen for example.

  10. #20
    SuzanneR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,726
    Images
    135
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob F. View Post
    Another squeegeer (squeegeeist? squeegeeator? squeegeephile? ... ) here. My take being as already stated by others: gets excess water off to assist even drying and no puddles. Laid on a sheet of plastic - one swish along the back - one swish along the front - lay face down on screens.

    Cheers, Bob.
    From one squeegeephile to another, I must, say.... there are few things more fun in photography than squeegeeing a print, aren't there? It's a favorite moment of mine always!

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin