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  1. #11
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Black dust, so it's on the film at the time of exposure. I think it's static electricity. It's worse in the winter when it's really dry here, so that theory makes sense.

    - Thomas

    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    A couple questions:

    What kind of dust are you talking about? Do you mean dust on your processed negatives from drying (white dust) or dust on the negative in the camera (black dust)?

    What is your developer/film combo. Some combinations will produce uneven development in just about all settings (the worst probably being the old Technidol/Tech Pan combo).

    T-max film and T-max developer, in my darkroom, are less likely to be uneven than some other combos.

    Could it be your film? Seems like you are doing all the right things.

    I can't help on the scratches because I only do either one-sheet-at-a-time or Jobo Drum.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  2. #12
    david b's Avatar
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    I am having all of the same issues. I even tried quick loads. I've probably shot 200 sheets in the last 9 months. I probably have $3000 invested.

    So, I am taking a break from it for now.

  3. #13
    MurrayMinchin's Avatar
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    I'm not familiar with those developers so I don't know how much is needed for a given area of film. I wish you a future filled only with even skies...good luck!

    Murray
    _________________________________________
    Note to self: Turn your negatives into positives.

  4. #14

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    I use a Jobo 3010 drum and a Fuji Quickload film holder. No scratches, ever, no dust, never.

  5. #15
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Another heads up for Jobo drums, easy to use and get consistent scratch free negatives. Although mine are the older 200 series, designed for inversion they are still in regular use 20+ years after I first bought them. Rectangular tanks areharder to agitate and get even development.

    Be careful what clothes you wear when you handle & load film into your dark-slides (film holders US-eng), sweaters (jumpers) are the worst, some types of shirt are bad too.

    Ian

  6. #16

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    I used to use a 120 tank and the "taco method", developing one or two sheets at a time. Using Rodinal 1+100, I always got fairly even development. I've now bought a Paterson Orbital, which can do four 4x5 sheets at a time and uses very little chemistry (I use 150ml, you can use less). The negatives are even, no scratches and it is dead easly to load & unload.

    A friend of mine uses a Jobo drum, and gets even development.

    I've not had any real problems with dust, but then we never suffer from low humidity... I just blow or brush out the holders, shake out the changing bag and load the holders. I have heard that some people give the holder a sharp tap in order to dislodge any dust prior to inserting it in the camera, but I'm not sure how advisable this is (and have not tried it myself).

    Good luck, and don't give up. Yet ...

  7. #17
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Most even ones

    It is ironic that as this thread is lingering, I scanned these negatives to check them again for evenness, so far it's only been based on what a look on the light table might give. These ones isn't too bad. They're developed in a slosher tray using Kodak Xtol chemistry full strength. Agitation every thirty seconds and by development (counting seconds from a metronome).

    I will take everybody's suggestions into consideration, especially with regards to dust. A very kind soul has offered to help me out with a processing drum and motor base. We will see how that endeavor goes. I'm excited. I'll probably start developing them at the normal times I have for roll film and go from there.

    Thanks again everybody for all of your suggestions and help, both here and in the instant messages.

    - Thomas
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 2007-09 Coastline 04.jpg   2007-09 Coastline 03s.jpg  
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  8. #18
    MurrayMinchin's Avatar
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    Hi Thomas,

    Are you using a changing bag to load film in your film holders? I had one that was rubber coated nylon on the outside and a loosely woven cotton on the inside and it literally rained the lint fibres down on my film. The solution was to turn the bag inside out and the problem was solved.

    Murray
    _________________________________________
    Note to self: Turn your negatives into positives.

  9. #19
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Hi Murray,

    I've used both my darkroom and a changing bag. I haven't really noticed a difference, but haven't looked really hard to distinguish a difference either. I believe the problem is static electricity anyway. I've been given the advice to use clothes dryer sheets and rub the film holders with it (used ones). Seems like a project worthwhile.

    Thanks for your suggestions. They are greatly appreciated. I think I eventually have to buy a changing tent.

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  10. #20
    Guillaume Zuili's Avatar
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    Hi Thomas,
    Jobo will make you feel better with sheet film, easy and flawless (almost...).
    Changing tent can be a beautiful dust trap. There is no rule.

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