Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,224   Posts: 1,532,585   Online: 946
      
Page 1 of 7 1234567 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 65
  1. #1
    ic-racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,169

    Mythbuster "You have to expose for the shadows and develop for the highlights"

    Here the first in a potential series of 'Mythbusters' dealing with topics of potential interest to photographers.

    *****************

    Mythbuster "You have to expose for the shadows and develop for the highlights"

    *****************

    Myth or Fact?

    Let's follow Bill and Sam through a "Fred Picker Inspired" basic photography course to find out.

    Both students load their identical, perfectly functioning cameras with identical TMY and shoot a series of test exposures, sharing the instructor's Pentax spot meter.. Bill listens closely to the instructor and makes a series of Zone I exposures at EI 6, 12, 25, 50, 100, 200 and 400.

    Sam gets confused with the aperture dial, and makes a series of Zone VIII exposures at IE 6, 12, 25, 50, 100 and 200 and 400.

    They develop their properly labeled film for 6 minutes in the same tank.

    Bill listens to the instructor and zeros the densitometer on his "film-base-plus-fog" and identifies the frame that has 0.1 log more DENSITY. The frame he winds up with was the Zone I frame shot at EI 200.

    Sam gets confused and zeros the densitometer to his FOGGED ( daylight-exposed) film base, then chooses the frame that has 0.1 log units more TRANSMISSION. The frame he winds up with was the Zone VIII frame shot at EI 12.

    With their new exposure indexes, Bill (EI 200) and Sam (EI 12) both make some Zone VIII exposures on two rolls of film each. Sam gets confused with the aperture ring, however, and makes exposures that have eight stops LESS exposure (essentially Zone I). Both develop their properly identified film in the same tank for 6 minutes.

    Bill and Sam head to the darkroom to test the development time. Bill places a piece of blank film-base-plus-fog into the enlarger and makes a test exposure. He identifies the first strip that is totally black and records the exposure.

    He then places his Zone VIII exposure (shot at ei 200) in the enlarger and exposes it for the same time as indicated in his black test exposure. He covers 1/2 of the paper during the exposure. He processes the print and notices a totally white sheet of paper. He concludes his Zone VIII is too dense and makes a note to decrease development of the next roll by 20%.

    Sam gets confused and places a piece of FOGGED (daylight-exposed) film base in the enlarger and makes a test exposure. He identifies the first strip that is totally white and records the exposure.

    He then places what he thinks is his Zone VIII frame in the enlarger. It really is a Zone I exposure shot at EI 12. He gets confused and exposes 1/2 of his test paper to white light, then exposes the other half to his Zone I frame at the indicated time. He processes the print and sees a totally black sheet of paper. He remembers correctly the instructor saying that if there is no difference in the two sides of the test print then decrease development. He makes a note to decrease development of the next roll by 20%.

    Bill and Sam take their second test roll that they had previously exposed above. They realize they are both decreasing development by 20% and the develop their properly identified film together in the same tank for 5.5 minutes.

    Bill repeats his Zone VIII frame test and gets a test print that is half pure white and just begins to show some density on the other side. He concludes that his development is correct and he is ready to start shooting pictures.

    Sam repeats his Zone VIII frame test (which he actually shot at Zone I) and gets a test print that is half pure black and is just slightly lighter on the other half. He remembers the instructors saying that if you can just barely see the difference in the two sides of the print that the development is correct. He concludes that his development is correct and he is ready to start shooting pictures.

    The instructor stands outside in bright sunlight holding a gray scale. Both Bill and Sam photograph him at the same time with their tripods next to each other. Bill uses the spot meter to measure the shadowed face of the instructor and places it on Zone III at EI 200. He makes his exposure (1/200th at F16). Bill then checks the sunlight white shirt of the instructor and it falls right on Zone VIII. He concludes the scene should work well with the development time he had just established.

    Sam gets confused and uses his spot meter to measure the sunlight white shirt of the instructor . He places the shirt on Zone VIII and makes his exposure at EI 12. His exposure is 1/12th of a second at F16. He then checks the shadowed face of the instructor and it falls right on Zone III, so he concludes the scene should work well with the development time he had just established.

    Again they develop their properly identified film together for 5.5 min. and go to the darkroom to make their best prints. They both submit their best prints to the instructor, but they forget to put their names on the back of the prints.

    They turn in their notebooks to the instructor and he sees that Sam got it all backwards. He EXPOSED FOR THE HIGHLIGHTS AND DEVELOPED FOR THE SHADOWS!:o Obviously, the instructor would be able to tell which print was Sam's and which was Bill's.

    Right?

    (prints to follow...)

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,054
    Sam ain't the sharpest tool in the shed, is he?

  3. #3
    JBrunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    6,780
    Quote Originally Posted by jim appleyard View Post
    Sam ain't the sharpest tool in the shed, is he?
    Made my day.

  4. #4
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Milton, DE, USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,980
    Blog Entries
    29
    Images
    19
    My head hurts. Attempting second half now.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
    APUG BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE
    DE Darkroom

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  5. #5
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Milton, DE, USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,980
    Blog Entries
    29
    Images
    19
    Naw, early morning on its way. I'll do da tinking thing later.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
    APUG BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE
    DE Darkroom

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  6. #6
    RoNinHeart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Nevada
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    86
    Images
    2
    Thank you for changing my name to Sam...
    Ronin

    "Place your clothes and [cameras] where you can find them in the dark.”
    with apologies to Robert Heinlein

  7. #7
    gainer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    3,726
    Images
    2
    I'm confused about how that old adage got to be associated with the Zone system, which didn't come until later. I knew the rules of the ASA system, and knew that it boiled down to a standard exposure meter that was designed to put the scene brightness that it measured a factor of 10 above the film's "inertia". If I knew my camera well enough, I could set the meter for 10X the ASA speed of the film I had and read the scene brightness at the darkest point where the detail was important. Since I used roll film only, I could not afford the luxury of developing each frame, so I used hard or soft paper and various printing tricks if necessary. If I had used sheet film, or had a whole roll with the same SBR, I could develop the negative more or less to suit. So, all one had to know was the ASA speed of the film, how to multiply by 10, and the exposure reading of the significant shadow.
    Gadget Gainer

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Eastern, Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,020
    Images
    55
    did you make a point or ask a question?

    i stopped reading after the third time you made fun of Sam

  9. #9
    jd callow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Milan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,002
    Images
    117
    Yeah I was feeling kind of bad for sam too

    *

  10. #10
    sun of sand's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    600
    Images
    10
    Yeah, really! lol
    As long as they both make it on the train I don't think it matters how old Bills apples are.

Page 1 of 7 1234567 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin