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  1. #1
    Andrei Ionita's Avatar
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    outdated film exposure

    Hello,

    I recently came across an outdated roll of azopan 100 (dated 02/1992). It wasn't refrigerated, as I found it in an old shoe box in my closet.

    What are the chances of success when exposing a long-outdated film? Any idea how much I should compensate the exposure?

    Many thanks,
    Andrew

  2. #2
    arigram's Avatar
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    I think the best way to deal with an old "mystery" film is to shoot it "for fun", that is accept that there could be faults, such as losing one or two stops of its dynamic range. Find a subject that would be enhanced if defects are present and meter and develop conservatively, maybe rating it a bit lower. Think of it as an experiment. You never know, you might be pleasantly surprised.
    aristotelis grammatikakis
    www.arigram.gr
    Real photographs, created in camera, 100% organic,
    no digital additives and shit




  3. #3
    Andrei Ionita's Avatar
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    Thanks for your reply, arigram.

    The film is going to be shot just for fun. I don't really expect any results from it, but it's worth a (documented) try.

    Being outdated for so long, I was wondering if I'd have to rate it lower than 1-2 stops (like ISO 50 or 25).

  4. #4
    kram's Avatar
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    I shot a Kodak film which was 34 YEARS OUT OF DATE. I developed it for ~15-20% longer than recommended - which, on inspecting the negs- was too long. Try developing for 5-10% than recommended. Film rated at box ASA.

  5. #5
    kram's Avatar
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    If commerical place processing it rate it down by only 1/3-1/2 a stop - or just shoot it at its rated speed.

  6. #6
    Mark Antony's Avatar
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    I just shot some Royal-x-pan dated 1976, whilst it had high base fog the negs were printable:
    Photo-Utopia/

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Antony View Post
    cool blog

    *

  8. #8
    Mark Antony's Avatar
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    Thank you.
    I try my best

  9. #9
    Andrei Ionita's Avatar
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    I was finally able to develop and scan the film (I know, it took me a lot). I exposed it as recommended by the producer and developed it for 8 mins at 20°C in a metol-based developer, similar to the recommended one.

    For the moment, I uploaded just one scan. More will be coming soon. Here it is.

    Thanks for the advices.

  10. #10
    kram's Avatar
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    See, no problem. Guess what - have just finished my second roll of October 1971 expired film. Lets hope more negs keep the emulsion on them this time.



 

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