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  1. #11
    Ole
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Verizzo View Post
    Surprised that no one has mentioned that the pentahydrate is what used to be called "hypo." Which is why we still use the term; a long, long tradition.
    Eh - no.

    "Thiosulfate" used to be called "hyposulfite". It doesn't have to mean sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate - it can mean any thiosulfate in any hydration state. But analog photographers tend to be a conservative bunch; and the little detail that all chemists in the world are using a different word carries little weight.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  2. #12

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    Yes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ole View Post
    Eh - no.

    "Thiosulfate" used to be called "hyposulfite". It doesn't have to mean sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate - it can mean any thiosulfate in any hydration state. But analog photographers tend to be a conservative bunch; and the little detail that all chemists in the world are using a different word carries little weight.
    Quite right, of course. I was limiting my comments to the modern offerings.

    Believe it or not, in my father's garage is a yellow box from Kodak that says "Sodium Thiosulfate, Hypo-Prismatic Type (Pentahydrated)". My father, ever the photographer had written on the side, "Hypo" many years ago. I have no idea why he kept this of all things.

    There is a pencil marking which I presume is the price: 45 cents for one pound. On the back are recipes for various fixers. "Plain Hypo" is 1 pound in two quarts of water; F-24 acid fixer, and than an acid hardening one. The inner wrap is paper, not plastic, and the hypo itself is chunky after decades in the Florida humidity. But it looks to be just fine.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Verizzo View Post
    No need for the anhydrous unless you
    are going backpacking...
    Or don't mind the extra postage.
    Or short on H2O. Dan

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