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  1. #1

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    Marking film/great tip.

    I found a ziplock baggy with 7 rolls of bulk film stashed in the back of my freezer.Great eh? Not really.
    I used a cheap marker to wright on the masking tape I had attached to the film canisters.What the heck are they?While relating this saga to my pal at the local camera shop an older gentleman offered a great bit of advice.When he bulk loaded film he'd use a fine tipped "Sharpie" to mark the film tab with date/type/# of exposures. Works great and I won't ever have the problem of "guess the film" again.

  2. #2
    Kevin Caulfield's Avatar
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    Yep, started doing that a couple of years ago. Nothing like a Sharpie.

  3. #3
    Alex Bishop-Thorpe's Avatar
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    That's pretty good advice, I'll keep it in mind...I try to keep a sharpie on me most of the time, they're pretty useful just in general.
    When I do forget, I tend to bite 35mm film cartridges after I shoot them to remind myself they have something important on them. It leaves a noticeable mark and I know they take top priority/care in processing. It works surprisingly well.
    The Analogue Laboratory, or 'so you built a darkroom in an old factory in the industrial zone'.
    Blog thing!.

    Worry less. Photograph more.

  4. #4

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    A fine tip sharpie is one of my standard darkroom tools. I use them to mark the back of test prints and contacts with exposure/paper/filtration/dev/whatever info

  5. #5
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I buy Sharpies by the box, keep them in all my camera bags, darkroom, desk, everywhere. They're very handy.

    You could cut a clip of the mystery film, develop it and read the edge markings to see what it is.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  6. #6
    Chazzy's Avatar
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    Why not write down what kind of film it is, etc., on paper and put that inside the bag, instead of trying to mark the outside of the bag?
    Charles Hohenstein

  7. #7

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    When bulk loading film, I write the data (with a Sharpie, naturally) on the film leader, on the base side. That way I have all the information on the particular film roll visible either in plastic bags, or when loading the roll into the camera. A tip I picked up years ago from a UPI photog who encouraged me to pick up my first 35: After rewinding a roll back into its casette (after first making sure that the film leader is not wound all the way in), fold the leader once if processing normal, and fold twice if push processing. With the film leaders folded, it also becomes impossible to accidentally load the same exposed roll in the camera. I've carried that tip with me for decades, and even now I continue to teach it to my students. (Willy, wherever you are, thanks!)

  8. #8

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    Fleath -what a great idea! I write the data on the leader with a sharpie too, but I have been known to pick up a roll of 35mm and wonder if I exposed it or not. I'll bite the end of the leader and leave a mark from now on, so I know it's been exposed. I love the simple answers.
    Rick Jason.
    "I'm still developing"

  9. #9
    Andy K's Avatar
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    I only shoot HP5+ and FP4+. I shoot both the same way (@ 320ASA and 100ASA), always.
    When bulk loading, to make recognition easy I bought coloured stickers. I put a green sticker on HP5+ rolls and a blue sticker on FP4+ rolls. Makes rolls easily recognisable at all times and I can see what film is in the camera through the preview window. I put the same colour labels on the canister lids too. Its a lot quicker than a Sharpie.


    -----------My Flickr-----------
    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  10. #10

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    Sharpies are by far the most significant product of my lifetime. I would be completely lost without them.

    http://www.sharpie.com/enUS/History/1961-1990.html

    And now that there's a silver metalic sharpie, life even gets better. I use the metalic colored sharpie to mark a line on all the darksides of my holders. Both film holders and plate holders. When pulling the darkside to take a photograph I'll reach the silver line, and that's where I'll stop. It helps me prevent unwanted light leaks from entering that end of the film holder.

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