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  1. #1

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    Washing film before developing?

    1.)Load the film on the reel and get it into the tank.


    2.)Turn on the sink and adjust the hot and cold water so that the water comes out pretty much at room temp. Fill the tank with tap water then turn off the water. Let the film sit in the water for 2 minutes or so. Then dump out the water. It will look very blue or purple from the antihalation dye in the film. Once again fill up the tank with tap water and dump it out. Do this a few times more until the water looks for the most part clear.
    I read this here: http://www.toycamera.com/index.php?o...id=45&Itemid=1

    What is the purpose (if any) of washing your film with water before develloping?

  2. #2

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    Hi Nathan

    Take a look at this thread:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/3...ng-enough.html

  3. #3

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    Thanks Uhner!
    I hadn't heard of pre-soaking... By the looks of it, its to wet the film for more even development and to remove the antihalation dye from the film...
    Arguments for and against...
    I'll do an experiment tomorrow. I'll give 1 roll TMAX 100 a 3-5min pre-soak, and devellop it together with another roll of TMAX 100 which i have exposed the same ASA and lighting conditions and see if there's a difference.

  4. #4

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    In my experience you need to adjust your developing times if you start to use pre-soak when developing film. Your times will be somewhat shorter because development will start instantly. This can have a large impact on density and contrast if you use a high strength developer.

  5. #5
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    The only reason not to do it is that it may not be necessary with the particular film and developer you are using.

    If you are having a problem with uneven development, then that's a good reason to try a presoak. If you aren't having any problem, then there's no reason to change what you're doing.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  6. #6
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Davids point is interesting, some people advocate pre-soaking others don't.

    The few times I've used a pre-soak I've been less happy with the results, and so always prefer not to use one. They really aren't necessary with B&W films.

    However with C41 & E6 processing then a presoak has the benefit of helping stabilise the (first) developer processing temperature by bringing the tank & film up to the much higher processing temperatures required for colour work.

    Ian
    Last edited by Ian Grant; 03-10-2008 at 07:17 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: grammar

  7. #7

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    I don't pre-soak generally, and Ilford says not to, FWIW.
    It's another one of those "if it works for you, and you like doing it, go for it" things.

  8. #8
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Another point is that presoaking at processing temperatures brings the film closer to processing temp and, though probably negligible, reduces the effect of warmer/colder film warming/cooling the temperature of the developer initially. Just another argument I have heard. Also helps to wash dust particles from the surface of the film before developing. Another two cents worth.
    Thank you.
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  9. #9

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    i notice that presoaking can shave up to a minute off of development times, but otherwise makes no difference. i do get more even development, but with correct agitation it's not really an issue. for expired films i do presoak, with some base-clearing agent for a clearer base.

    for sheet film i never presoak, but i pay the price when my developer turns completely green and i hesitate to reuse that green crap.

  10. #10

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    Pre-soaking allows the developer to penetrate the film more quickly and more evenly. While some may see this step as unnecessary, If you are are working with a thick emulsion film like Efke, failing to prewash may mean that the silver on the surface of the emulsion is getting far more development then silver closer to the film base. This results in images that are much sharper, but do not utilize the potential tonal scale.

    yours;

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