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  1. #1
    Pete Millson's Avatar
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    OUT OF DATE TRI-X

    Hi all.

    Ever the penny pincher, I've today been given some out of date (year 2000!) Tri-x.

    Someone today said that the main problem will be loss of speed - I would need to rate the film at something other than my usual 400.

    Does anyone have any exact (-ish) science on this or even simply what I should rate this film at. I'm only ever after securing 'moments' so if the film's character has changed in any way, I don't mind. I just need to get a printable negative.

    Regards,

    PETE.

  2. #2
    fhovie's Avatar
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    I use a lot of it - I shoot it at 200 and develop it in XTOL 1:1 and get great results - I also push it to 1600 with good results - the base fog is close to .2 normally (fresh is more like .1) and at 1600 it is closer to .35 - still plenty printable.
    My photos are always without all that distracting color ...

  3. #3

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    hey pete

    i have been using a lot of outdated tri x as well, some goes back into the 1990s
    i rate it between 100 + 200 ... and i process it in print developer ...
    you can try playing with ilford id11, maybe a little stronger than usual
    you should get some nice negatives

    good luck
    john
    ask me how ..

  4. #4

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    The great thing about silver film is it never really expires. I've been shooting some Verichrome Pan with an expiration date of 1971 and still getting printable images out of it. It's a little thick, but I dare anyone in the future to get a useful image out of 40-year-old digital gear without a serious investment in building a contemporary computer system.

  5. #5
    Pete Millson's Avatar
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    Great thanks folks. Okto, that's my feelings too. The image is on the negative, just hold it up to the light - it's there!

    I'll rate it at 200 and see how it goes with Xtol at 1:1.

    PETE.

  6. #6

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    If it has been kept well, film that expired in 2000 is probably still good. But the only way to really tell is to try some, preferably on something unimportant. Trying some exposures at lower ISOs may be a good idea, too. Then you can see if the film is still good, if the fog level is higher than usual, and if the speed is still as advertised. Then you can expose and process the rest as appropriate.

  7. #7

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    out of date Tri-x

    Hi Pete: I've been processing out of date film for a few months and my suggestion is,if you can get it,is purchase a small bottle of Edwals Liquid Orthazite.It contains benzotriazole,an anti foggant.I've used it and it does a good job keeping the fog level down to a printable level.Start with 5-10 ml per litre of developer and see what happens.

    Doug



 

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