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  1. #11

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    I use distilled water make stock solution for my developers and HCA, and working for my fixer, TF4, and selenium toner. A 5 micron carbon filter is to filter sand, silt, rust particles and other sediments particles my tap water.

  2. #12

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    I use purified water for my chemicals and tap(well) water for my washes. I use the bottled water for consistency. I do need to put on a filter for my washes though. There is some crud from the well at times. I have to clean out the clothes washer fill line about once every two months.

    Mike

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by ronobvious View Post
    I had a simple question about water when mixing your own chems. Do you need to use distilled/reverse osmosis water when mixing any and all chems? It seems to me that you do, since pH can vary widely from one city to another and you're dealing with acids & bases here.
    I think any minor buffering or pH altering impurities in your water would be vastly overwhelmed / saturated by the compounds in your photographic chemistry. I've never had any problems using tap water; I just use a wetting agent at the very end of my rinse (right before pulling my paper/film out) to keep calcium deposits from appearing on stuff.
    The universe is a haunted house. -Coil
    .

  4. #14

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    I use filtered tap water for everything and have never had a problem from it. Once in a while I need to mix up some Diafine, and the instructions call for distilled water. I follow the directions. I'd be annoyed if I wasted a good batch of Diafine because I was too pig headed to follow the manufacturer's recommendation.

  5. #15
    Dave Miller's Avatar
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    Like many others I use tap water for all but two items, which are: mixing staining developer, and my final film wash; for these I use filtered tap water.

    I agree with you that developing monochrome film is so simple that there is little reason not to do it yourself. Your choice of chemicals and equipment will give good results. I also work in a temperature controlled environment so don’t use a tempering bath. I think consistency is much more important than using any particular developing temperature.

    You may not have noticed that there is a sister site – Hybridphoto.com – where scanning issues are discussed, it may be of help; link at the top of the page.
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    I use filtered tap water.

    If you are worried about hard water, use prepacked chemistry which has addenda to get around the problem.

    The pH of your water supply is totally unimportant, as it is unbuffered and has no buffer capacity. Developers and fixers are highly buffered and are not affected by the pH of the water in which they are mixed provided it is normal city water.

    PE
    PE, we have hard water here in London (108 mg Ca per litre) and I always get drying marks on film if I don't use distilled water. What (simple) adaptive could I add to B&W, E6 and C41 chemicals to counter-act this?
    Last edited by markbb; 03-15-2008 at 03:38 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #17
    Bobby Ironsights's Avatar
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    I think you mean additive mark, and it's a lost cause. Adding more crap to your water will not make beads of water dry without leaving the mineral deposits behind.

    Those compounds just don't evaporate.

    You could use photoflo (a wetting agent) and then just squeegee them off, but it's not really all that different from just squeegee'ing them off in the first place and you can damage delicate emulsions.

    30 pence worth of distilled water might serve you better. (distilled, not spring)

  8. #18

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    Bobby,
    I rather thought so. I don't always use distilled water for all steps, especially E6 with all those washes, but I always use it for the finals step.

  9. #19
    David H. Bebbington's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobby Ironsights View Post
    I think you mean additive mark, and it's a lost cause. Adding more crap to your water will not make beads of water dry without leaving the mineral deposits behind.

    Those compounds just don't evaporate.

    You could use photoflo (a wetting agent) and then just squeegee them off, but it's not really all that different from just squeegee'ing them off in the first place and you can damage delicate emulsions.

    30 pence worth of distilled water might serve you better. (distilled, not spring)
    I don't follow your reasoning. Photo-flo is not "crap", it is a surfactant or tenside which reduces the surface tension holding water droplets to vertically-hanging film to the degree that the water is able to run off completely and not be left behind to evaporate, leaving mineral deposits. The effect is the same as mechanical removal using a squeegee but obviously since there is no physical contact between the film and any removal device, there is also no risk of scratching.

    Regards,

    David

  10. #20
    Dave Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markbb View Post
    PE, we have hard water here in London (108 mg Ca per litre) and I always get drying marks on film if I don't use distilled water. What (simple) adaptive could I add to B&W, E6 and C41 chemicals to counter-act this?
    If you don't get drying marks when using distilled water, then why change?
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


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