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  1. #11
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    "Work flow"? That sounds like some kind of computer-speak.

    I have a little Moleskine notebook where I write down information relevant to each exposure as needed, and if I have a print that involves a lot of dodging and burning, I'll make a diagram that I keep with the contact sheet or sometimes I'll make the diagram on the contact sheet or a work print.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  2. #12

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    I note on the back of contact sheets filtration, exposure, and developer and paper. I do the same with test prints, usually the paper is MG IV RC, but not always.
    I also have a spiral notebook, and I make notes in it for anything that progresses beyond initial tests, I note each round of test prints, with paper and exposure details and notes on any burning or dodging. If I do a variant with another paper or develper, or whatever then that round gets added.

    Some of the workflow is just mechanics, for example I have a piece of masking tape on the enlarger rail which marks the positions for contact sheets with an 80mm lens and a 135. So setting up a contact sheet consists of running the enlarger head to the mark, putting in the appropriate lens and empty carrier then focusing on the carrier edge. The height is determined by what it takes to make a full-frame 8x10. In this way there is never any variation for the enlarger height, or where the lens is.

    Contacts always start at the same exposure and filtration, and I'll make a second if I have unusually thin or dense negs that I want to evaluate as positives. My holy grail is to not have any unusually thin or dense negs that need compensation.

    The contacts get filed along side the negative sleeve pages.
    For negs that get final prints I mark the sleeve where the negative sits with exposure, paper and filtration.
    About the most important tool in all this is a fine point sharpie.
    Though the spiral notebook works fairly well for this, I am likely to buy Jason's print record and try that out, as the notebook lacks organization.

    "Work flow"? That sounds like some kind of computer-speak.
    I was thinking that too, it reminds me too much of my day job, don't get me started on WorkFlow...

  3. #13
    Joe Lipka's Avatar
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    Three ring notebook going back to the very beginning for silver printing. Printing notes (f stops, times, # of exposures), sketches, enlarger settings developer, time and all that good stuff. A separate book for pt/pd prints.
    Two New Projects! Light on China - 07/13/2014

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    250+ posts and still blogging! "Postcards from the Creative Journey"

    http://blog.joelipkaphoto.com/

  4. #14

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    For the average negs that don’t require a lot of manipulation I’ll keep the info in a binder. For the difficult negs (to many to mention), instead of a sketch I’ll make a straight print at about ¼ of the regular exposure and use my Sharpie to mark all the dodging and burning info. Usually I indicate the info in terms of +2x, -½ , etc. All the regular info is also on the print.

    Mike

  5. #15
    Xia_Ke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    "Work flow"? That sounds like some kind of computer-speak.
    Guess my computer background shows huh? I started years ago with CAD, graphic design, and 3-D graphics. Then a little over a year ago decided I needed a new hobby and was bitten by the photography bug. Started out with digital and a D50. Last Summer I started getting frustrated because I wanted film feel with my B&W shots and couldn't get it with digital. Sold the digi and started shooting film and scanning until I could get the funds to put together a darkroom. Finally got that going about 3 weeks ago. Excuse me while I vent for one second now...

    Tonight was the first night in a long time I missed the "comfort" of Photoshop. It's what I know. Feel like I'm starting photography all over again. Just could not get a damn thing to work out the way I wanted. I'd show you what I mean but, it's all in the trash now. ARGH!

    Okay, I'm done. Just needed to get that out...LOL

    Thanks everyone for chiming in
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    "A good photograph is one that makes the viewer so aware of the subject that they are unaware of the print."- Kodak
    "...if you find afterwards that you made a mistake, the price of the film and chemicals was...tuition!" - greybeard
    "The hard part isn’t the decisive moment or anything like that – it’s getting the film on the reel!" - John Szarkowski

  6. #16
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    kinda simple

    File negs into three ring binder sleeve. Print a contact sheet. Number the film and contact sheet. 2008-3-x where x is the number of the film that has made it into the contact sheets in the order that they get there this month.

    Contact sheet backlog binder. When I print, I always try to pull some out of this binder to print before the night is done. A printed neg gets the contact sheet image it corresponds to circled by a sharpie marker, and the neg number and date on the back of the contact sheet.

    The print gets the neg number and the date printed on the back. A ring bound notebook records what every print session does , in terms of paper, dev, exposure, dodge/burn etc.

    When the contact sheet is what I feel mostly worked over, I file it into my 'year binder'. Any contact sheet related info, like model releases, contact information, etc also goes together with the neg and contact sheet.

  7. #17
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xia_Ke View Post
    Tonight was the first night in a long time I missed the "comfort" of Photoshop. It's what I know. Feel like I'm starting photography all over again. Just could not get a damn thing to work out the way I wanted. I'd show you what I mean but, it's all in the trash now. ARGH!

    Okay, I'm done. Just needed to get that out...LOL

    Thanks everyone for chiming in
    It takes a while to get everything smoothed out, and even then you'll come up against a neg here and there that simply vexes. Its part of the schtick. Usually if I have a neg that is vexing, I'll quit on it and revisit it fresh. That usually does the trick. The other piece of advice is not to struggle with a bad neg. The best I ever did was make it not suck. These days, I save my energy for the ones that can sing.

  8. #18
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    Sometimes with a sheet film neg that is for platinum printing I will write the formula I used down on the film sleeve. When doing a large (16x20) custom print for someone there is a good chance of damage in washing and drying so I write down basic details. For my own silver gel work I don't want to try to do the same thing everytime. I would rather have the chance that I might see it differently. I do however, when experimenting with different paper and developer, write on the back of a print before processing it what is the paper type and developer. But unless there is some reason that you know you have to repeat exactly what you did, it is far more interesting to start fresh if you are going to reprint. I have had negs that were near impossible to get what I wanted out of, then went back sometime later and started over and they nearly fall on the paper. There are so many approaches to do the same thing and so many different ways of seeing something.

  9. #19
    Monophoto's Avatar
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    I try to make brief notes on the back of each print - after printing and before putting the paper into the developer. I use FB paper for most of my work, and a soft pencil works fine. If I'm using RC paper, I use a Sharpie. However, I will admit that I'm not always as careful or as thorough as I should be.

    I also keep a set of notebooks that contain proof sheets and records sheets for each set of negatives - 35mm roll, or set of four 4x5 negs. I always record the negative processing details on the record sheet, and for the 4x5 work I record the exposure information. The record sheet includes space for printing information, and I try to record the final printing information (paper, exposure, lens aperture, brief burning and dodging instructions, etc) as a starting point if I want to come back in a later session and reprint that negative.
    Louie

  10. #20
    Xia_Ke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner View Post
    It takes a while to get everything smoothed out, and even then you'll come up against a neg here and there that simply vexes. Its part of the schtick. Usually if I have a neg that is vexing, I'll quit on it and revisit it fresh. That usually does the trick. The other piece of advice is not to struggle with a bad neg. The best I ever did was make it not suck. These days, I save my energy for the ones that can sing.
    Thanks Jason. That was part of the problem, I was trying to print some bad negatives of shots I really liked and was able to fix before in Photoshop but, couldn't come close in the darkroom. Hopefully someday I'l get good enough to be able to print them. Need to remember I still have tons to learn and it won't happen over night
    flickr

    "A good photograph is one that makes the viewer so aware of the subject that they are unaware of the print."- Kodak
    "...if you find afterwards that you made a mistake, the price of the film and chemicals was...tuition!" - greybeard
    "The hard part isn’t the decisive moment or anything like that – it’s getting the film on the reel!" - John Szarkowski

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