Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,223   Posts: 1,532,495   Online: 1096
      
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 28 of 28
  1. #21
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    22,972
    Images
    65
    In the trade, the curl which takes place the length of the film is called piping, as it makes the film look like a length of pipe. The other curl is called curl or 'set' because it comes about by being rolled onto a roll. It is most prevalent on older film or film stored improperly. If you have both types you are in a world of hurt.

    Film that curls before processing is old or has been stored very poorly and is difficult to thread onto a processing reel.

    PE

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    San Diego, CA, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,246
    Images
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by mikebarger View Post
    I tried this stuff in 120 for a very short while, I can only hang so much weight on the line I dry film on. I've used two weighted clips and didn't help a bit.

    I'm like the OP, if you can get it into sleeves it took weeks not over night to get it semi flat.
    My experience is the same. I can live with it---I mainly use this film for "smoke-testing" new cameras and the like---but it does take some extra effort. I can get it into sleeves without too much trouble now; my technique is to bend it slightly in the transverse (short) direction near the point of entry into the sleeve. What's *really* hard, I think, is cutting the roll into strips and keeping it from sproinging into a tight roll as soon as the weight is gone.

    I could live without Fomapan/Arista, but not without some other seriously curly films like Adox ORT25; I'm stuck dealing with curl anyway, so I might as well put up with it from the Arista film as well.

    -NT

  3. #23
    Andrew Moxom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Keeping the British end up in Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,868
    Images
    333
    I occaisionally use Arista Ultra EDU in 120 also. Seems ot be ann in tersting film, but I get the same curl no matter how I dry, weighted, unweighted, stored inside neg files under a large book for a few days. The only way around it for me is to stop down my enlarger lens 2 stops more :-( I use it very occasionally though so I can live with it for the times I do use it. I also use Fuji ACROS and it does stay flat, but is very thin.
    Please check out my website www.amoxomphotography.com and APUG Portfolio .....

  4. #24
    Bobby Ironsights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Thunder Bay, ON, Canada
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    123
    Images
    6
    Yeah, what I don't know is why arista.edu in 35 mm is so flat that it takes a few seconds to figure out which side is the emulsion side, but they can't do that with the 120 size.

    Maybe I'll just switch to acros for 120 and keep using the arista.edu for bulk 35mm and sheet film.

  5. #25
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    22,972
    Images
    65
    Well, as has been argued elsewhere, some 120 films are coated on thinner support, but even so, all things being equal, the narrower the film the less curl in either direction.

    PE

  6. #26

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Woonsocket, RI USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,725
    Foma (aka Arista.EDU Ultra) films are also odd in that the 35mm variety has a clear/gray base and poor anti-halation characteristics, whereas the MF variety has a blue base and much better anti-halation characteristics. I'm not sure what the story is there, but it could well have something to do with the lack of curl in 35mm vs. substantial curl in MF to which Bobby refers.

  7. #27
    RoBBo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    255
    Images
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694 View Post
    Foma (aka Arista.EDU Ultra) films are also odd in that the 35mm variety has a clear/gray base and poor anti-halation characteristics, whereas the MF variety has a blue base and much better anti-halation characteristics. I'm not sure what the story is there, but it could well have something to do with the lack of curl in 35mm vs. substantial curl in MF to which Bobby refers.
    How bad is the halation on the 35mm version? Worth playing around with for effect? Or just bad enough to be annoying?

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,101
    Images
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by RoBBo View Post
    How bad is the halation on the 35mm version? Worth playing around with for effect? Or just bad enough to be annoying?
    I think it is something worth exploring. I discovered it by accident when shooting high contrast indoor scenes.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin