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  1. #1
    Bobby Ironsights's Avatar
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    getting very tired of arista.edu curl in 120

    Hi, I shoot the cheapest. ALWAYS. I reason that a silver halide is a silver halide and I'll worry about the rest when I can afford to.

    I shoot a seagull not a hassie, I decided to splurge and get the fancy model with the 4 element coated lens. Cost me all of 200 bucks.

    I do get very good images though, and shoot the hell out of my seagull feeding it the dollar eighty rolls of Arista.edu in 100, 200 and 400.

    The thing is though, the negatives curl.

    ALOT! I've shot alot of 120, but I've ONLY ever shot arista in it, so I assumed it was a function of those teeny little spools. It's actually a bit of a handful to contact, and I find it's best to leave it in the binder a couple months before it starts to flatten out enough to avoid forming a roll out of the sleeve the moment it's allowed out of the binder.

    I gave a couple rolls of arista to my photo instructor the other day though, and she in turn gave me a roll of T-Max. I didn't think about it again, till today, when I slapped it in and went downstairs to shoot my GF.

    It developed no problem, and annoyingly, it has a teensy bit of purple dye after fixing for ten minutes...

    No biggie, I've had that before.

    Then she comes out of the bathroom to sleeve it....IT'S FRIGGIN' FLAT!!!!

    I can't beleive it, the negs are flat, and sleeve and contact like a dream.

    I like flat, and I went online to look at the price and nearly shat myself. It's more than four dollars a friggin' roll!!!

    That's just not going to happen, so I start perusing the other films that are cheap, like foma, and lo and behold they have fuji acros, for about two bucks sixty a roll.

    Two bucks sixty a roll is no joke mind you, that's alot of money when you hog through film like a fool like me. But I've got to wonder, does it dry flat like the T-max?

    Because if it dries nice and flat, I might start living the high life on Acros.

  2. #2
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    My acros is flat.

  3. #3
    RoBBo's Avatar
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    10 minute fix?
    Jesus man.
    3 minute fix!
    15 minute wash!
    What is this!

  4. #4

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    I'm a huge cheepass, too. And I shot a Seagull and arista.edu (and then ultra), too.

    After having to fix the stuck shutter in the seagull about 10 times, I gave that POS away and got a used Rolleicord. And after trying to scan and wetprint curled up arista.edu films for a couple years, I decided it was well worth it in time and aggro to spend the extra $1.00 or so a roll and use Tri-X in 120.

    Dont get me wrong, Im still a cheepass. In 35mm I favor an old Kiev and Heilos 108 I got on ebay for $40 and I wind my own Tri-X onto carts I got $20 for 200 on ebay as well. And I soup my own film (except for the rare roll of e-6). Hell, I even use Rodinal (on 120 where grain isn't so much an issue) to save money when I can -- 1:100 dilution will make a bottle last years. And I print on arista.edu ultra FB paper. So yeah. Cheep.

    But having said that, my time is the most valuable thing I have and I refuse to spend it fighting crappy chinese cameras or crappy croatian film. When you decide to change the emphasis from cheaper to better or faster, it still pays off -- it's a zero-sum game. Trust me on this one.

  5. #5
    Snapshot's Avatar
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    If you want to remain a cheapass, there are some things you can do to reduce curl. You can...

    - Use clip weights. Distribute the weight evenly and avoid weighing down the center portions of the film.
    - Avoid wiping your film of excess water. Allow the film to drip-dry and this will reduce concave curl.
    - Avoid using anything to accelerate the drying process, like a drying cabinet.

    I use plenty of APX 100, which can curl and by doing the above has significantly reduced this tendency.
    "The secret to life is to keep your mind full and your bowels empty. Unfortunately, the converse is true for most people."

  6. #6
    Aurelien's Avatar
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    As far as I know, arista edu is Foma or Forte. I don't remember exactly, but the problem is the same with curling, and treatment same too. In fact, if you use a hardenning fixer, and let your film dry with a heavy weight for one night, your issues will be solved. That is what I do, and clearly my negatives are almost flat. And clearly, it's nicer to use them...
    Aurelien, Analog Photographer

    the analog place to be

  7. #7

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    Cheaper film curls - more expensive film doesn't in my experience. As some have said you can try to reduce the amount of curl but I have found that if I use Foma, Forte, Bergger, Rollei (Agfa) etc it will curl. If I use Kodak, Ilford, Fuji it doesn't. That's life!

  8. #8

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    Acros dries flat, and is a very nice film in other ways too.

    As for curly films (I like Efke 25 and 100, both of which curl), the best way I have come across to get them flat is to sleeve the roll (when completely dry of course) and roll it in the reverse direction to the curl. Roll it tight enough to fit in one of the Ekfe/Adox 120 film cannisters. After a day or two, take it out and it should be nice and flat.

    I've tried all other methods (bar the hardening fixer) and none have cured the curl.

  9. #9

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    You buy cheap, you get cheap.

  10. #10

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    I have recently developed a few rolls of Kodak Verichrome Pan and Tri-X 120 film from the early sixties. Since these films came out flat after development I wonder why current films like Rollei Retro and Fomapan still curls to the point that it makes it hard to fit them in a negative holder… Is it still that hard, or expensive, to make 120 film flat?

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