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  1. #1

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    What kind of water to use?

    In my area I buy <ozoned water> at the drug store and on the bottle it said
    <equal to deminiralized water>. I'm a bit confused between ozoned, deminirilezed, distilled ... water. Is somebody can explain the differences and what is the influence on a photographic process.

  2. #2

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    deionised is ususally purest and nearest to PH7
    distilled or reverse osmosis is next best
    De ozoned? Just boiling it will remove chlorine and probably ozone too.
    De mineralised is probably near to distilled.

    Fact is that tap water is fine for all processes unless it contains a lot of minerals. The minerals don't affect the development but they do leave sediment/drying marks on the film when it dries and that is the biggest potential problem with tap water.

    Therefore demineralised should be fine but many people just put their tap water through a household water filter before using it to be sure.

    Off the shelf photo chemicals are buffered against PH variances in tap water so tap water is fine. It's only when you get into mixing your own chemical formulas that distilled or deionised water may be required because your home brew developer may not be buffered and may react with minerals in the water.

    So for cheap more than adequate quality water, filter tap water and use for mixing developer, then final rinse of film in filtered water to be be sure of absolute minimum of drying marks on film.

    No need of expensive distilled or demineralised water if you have filtered it through a household water filter.

    YMMV

  3. #3

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    Incorrect

    Quote Originally Posted by rob champagne View Post
    deionised is ususally purest and nearest to PH7
    distilled or reverse osmosis is next best
    De ozoned? Just boiling it will remove chlorine and probably ozone too.
    De mineralised is probably near to distilled.

    Fact is that tap water is fine for all processes unless it contains a lot of minerals. The minerals don't affect the development but they do leave sediment/drying marks on the film when it dries and that is the biggest potential problem with tap water.

    Therefore demineralised should be fine but many people just put their tap water through a household water filter before using it to be sure.

    Off the shelf photo chemicals are buffered against PH variances in tap water so tap water is fine. It's only when you get into mixing your own chemical formulas that distilled or deionised water may be required because your home brew developer may not be buffered and may react with minerals in the water.

    So for cheap more than adequate quality water, filter tap water and use for mixing developer, then final rinse of film in filtered water to be be sure of absolute minimum of drying marks on film.

    No need of expensive distilled or demineralised water if you have filtered it through a household water filter.

    YMMV
    Filters do NOT take out minerals, only sediment. If your filter is part of a reverse osmosis unit, then the RO (properly maintained) does take out the minerals.

    We went through this just last week, didn't we?

    Bottled distilled water is so darned cheap I'm at a loss of why we keep agnozing over this. And that's speaking as a PS (Professional Skinflint.) I use it for developers and final photo-flo wash.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by rob champagne View Post
    deionised is ususally purest and nearest to PH7
    distilled or reverse osmosis is next best
    I thought it was the other way 'round???

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    Quote Originally Posted by jim appleyard View Post
    I thought it was the other way 'round???
    You have a dilemma then

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    99.999% of the water used in my darkroom is tap water (albeit through a water softener).

    I use reverse osmosis filtered water for the final (PhotoFlo) rinse of negatives. And I keep a bottle of distilled water for use in diluting chemicals in alternative printing - I think I've used about 2ml in the last year, so I really wonder if the usage justifies the spaced occupied by that jug in my darkroom.
    Louie

  7. #7
    naeroscatu's Avatar
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    I use bottled distilled water ($0.99 for 4L) since I mix my own developers and my tap water proved to have calcium sediments. I installed a water softener in the house but cannot change my habits so I keep using distilled.
    Mihai Costea

    "There's more to the picture
    Than meets the eye." - Neil Young

    Galleries:My PN & My APUG

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by normmamiya View Post
    In my area I buy <ozoned water> at the drug store and on the bottle it said
    <equal to deminiralized water>. I'm a bit confused between ozoned, deminirilezed, distilled ... water. Is somebody can explain the differences and what is the influence on a photographic process.
    Realy, the question is - Does it matter what water I use ?
    And the standard answer is - no, not realy unless you have very poor quality tap water or a very few developers (Rodinal & such).
    If you use most standard developers (D76/ID11 & similar) they are made with sufficient buffers to neutralise most tap water.
    If you have well water it is worth filtering it before making up working solutions.
    If it looks cloudy after mixing - then filter it again before using it.
    If you have sediments in you tap water - particle filter the wash water.
    It is generaly only worth using demineralised/de-ionised/distilled/reverse osmosis on the final wash & rinse - either with or without photo-flo depending on your personal choice.
    Exactly what you are buying when you buy treated water is always a bit of a mistery - sellers hide behind sales speak too much
    My test for this is to pour a glass of the water in question - then leave it on top of a radiator to evaporate - then judge how much sediment is left.
    Idealy it would be none at all - but in reality there will always be a little.
    If you have a selection of waters to choose from try them all with the same test and go with the lowest deposit that you can realy afford to use - and try it against your own tap water just for good meassure.
    Good luck
    Martin

  9. #9
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    It's an issue because not everywhere in the world sells gallon jugs of distilled water in their grocery stores. The only readily available product off the shelf here in the UK is deionised and that's in small 1 litre amounts usually at car stores for topping up batteries, possibly for putting in irons so they don't limescale themselves to death with our hard tapwater. I know there's a marine fish shop nearby that sells RO water and I'm probably going to get some there.
    And it does matter to me, at least, if I'm mixing £16.50/25g silver nitrate plus other chemicals for van dyke brown alternative process. You do sometimes need this information though it's probably a lot less relevant to the normal B&W process unless you are mixing from scratch where no one else but you yourself is going to put it through testing like Kodak and Ilford have for their chemicals.
    ~Heather
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    http://www.stargazy.org/

  10. #10

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    Deionized water

    Quote Originally Posted by normmamiya View Post
    In my area I buy <ozoned water> at the drug store and on the bottle it said
    <equal to deminiralized water>. I'm a bit confused between ozoned, deminirilezed, distilled ... water. Is somebody can explain the differences and what is the influence on a photographic process.
    The majority of dissolved impurities in modern water supplies are ions such as calcium, magnesium, sodium, chlorides, etc. The deionization process removes ions from water via filtration and ion exchange.

    Resistivity/ conductivity is the most convenient method for testing Dl water quality. Deionized pure water is a poor electrical conductor, having a resistivity of 18.2 million ohm-cm (18.2 megohms).

    See: http://www.myronl.com/applications/diapp.htm
    Tom Hoskinson
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    Everything is analog - even digital :D

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